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Convergence in Emerging Europe; Sustainability and Vulnerabilities

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  • Athanasios Vamvakidis

Abstract

The emerging European economies have been converging rapidly towards the more advanced European economies in recent years. However, large external imbalances in parts of the region have raised questions about sustainability and concerns about vulnerabilities. Empirical evidence in this paper suggest that the convergence trend of emerging Europe is based on strong fundamentals and is expected to continue, but at a slower pace. Moreover, the convergence path may be volatile as countries with large external imbalances adjust, with risks of a hard landing in some cases.

Suggested Citation

  • Athanasios Vamvakidis, 2008. "Convergence in Emerging Europe; Sustainability and Vulnerabilities," IMF Working Papers 08/181, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/181
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maria Milesi-Ferretti, Gian & Razin, Assaf, 1998. "Sharp reductions in current account deficits An empirical analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 897-908, May.
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    4. Ceyla Pazarbasioglu & Gudrun Johnsen & Paul Louis Ceriel Hilbers & Inci Ötker, 2005. "Assessing and Managing Rapid Credit Growth and the Role of Supervisory and Prudential Policies," IMF Working Papers 05/151, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Olivier Blanchard & Francesco Giavazzi, 2002. "Current Account Deficits in the Euro Area: The End of the Feldstein Horioka Puzzle?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(2), pages 147-210.
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    7. David Moore & Athanasios Vamvakidis, 2008. "Economic Growth in Croatia: Potential and Constraints," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 32(1), pages 1-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stjepan Zdunic, 2011. "From the impossible monetary trinity towards economic depression," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 29(2), pages 395-422.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    External debt; Europe; Emerging markets; Economic growth; Balance of payments; Transition economies; European Economy; Current Account Adjustment; current account; current account deficits; real gdp;

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