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The Macroeconomic Effects of Migration from the New European Union Member States to the United Kingdom


  • Dora M Iakova


The United Kingdom allowed workers from the ten new European Union member countries immediate access to its labor market after the accession in 2004. This paper uses a general equilibrium framework to explore the dynamic adjustment of the UK economy to the postaccession surge in immigration. Simulations show that immigration is likely to have positive effects on economic growth, capital accumulation, consumption, and the public finances.

Suggested Citation

  • Dora M Iakova, 2007. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Migration from the New European Union Member States to the United Kingdom," IMF Working Papers 07/61, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/61

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David Blanchflower & Jumana Saleheen & Chris Shadforth, 2007. "The impact of the recent migration from Eastern Europe on the UK economy," Discussion Papers 17, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    2. Boeri, Tito & Brücker, Herbert, 2005. "Migration, Co-ordination Failures and EU Enlargement," IZA Discussion Papers 1600, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ray Barrell & Catherine Guillemineau & Iana Liadze, 2006. "Migration in Europe," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 198(1), pages 36-39, October.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2001. "Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 69-134.
    5. Hamid Faruqee & Douglas Laxton & Bart Turtelboom & Peter Isard & Eswar S Prasad, 1998. "Multimod Mark III; The Core Dynamic and Steady State Model," IMF Occasional Papers 164, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Hamid Faruqee & Douglas Laxton, 2000. "Life-Cycles, Dynasties, Savings; Implications for Closed and Small, Open Economies," IMF Working Papers 00/126, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Hamid Faruqee, 2002. "Population Aging and its Macroeconomic Implications; A Framework for Analysis," IMF Working Papers 02/16, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Blanchard, Olivier J, 1985. "Debt, Deficits, and Finite Horizons," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(2), pages 223-247, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vladimir Borgy & Xavier Chojnicki, 2009. "Labor Migration: Macroeconomic and Demographic Outlook for Europe and Neighborhood Regions," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 119, pages 115-153.
    2. Reuven Brenner & Gabrielle A. Brenner, 2010. "Venture Capital in Canada: Lessons for Building (or Restoring) National Wealth," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 22(1), pages 86-98.
    3. Francesca D'Auria & Kieran Mc Morrow & Karl Pichelmann, 2008. "Economic impact of migration flows following the 2004 EU enlargement process - A model based analysis," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 349, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    4. Ray Barrell & John Fitzgerald & Rebecca Riley, 2010. "EU Enlargement and Migration: Assessing the Macroeconomic Impacts," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 373-395, March.


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