IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/imf/imfwpa/07-263.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Education and Health in G7 Countries; Achieving Better Outcomes with Less Spending

Author

Listed:
  • Victoria Gunnarsson
  • Stéphane Carcillo
  • Marijn Verhoeven

Abstract

Enhancing the efficiency of education and health spending is a key policy challenge in G7 countries. The paper assesses this efficiency and seeks to establish a link between differences in efficiency across countries and policy and institutional factors. The findings suggest that reforms aimed at increasing efficiency need to take into account the nature and causes of inefficiencies. Inefficiencies in G7 countries mostly reflect lack of cost effectiveness in acquiring real resources, such as teachers and pharmaceuticals. We also find that high wage spending is associated with lower efficiency. In addition, lowering student-teacher ratios is associated with reduced efficiency in the education sector, while immunizations and doctors' consultations coincide with higher efficiency in the health sector. Greater autonomy for schools seems to raise efficiency in secondary education.

Suggested Citation

  • Victoria Gunnarsson & Stéphane Carcillo & Marijn Verhoeven, 2007. "Education and Health in G7 Countries; Achieving Better Outcomes with Less Spending," IMF Working Papers 07/263, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/263
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=21444
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Coco, Giuseppe & Lagravinese, Raffaele, 2014. "Cronyism and education performance," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 443-450.
    2. Ana Poças & Elias Soukiazis, 2010. "Health Status Determinants in the OECD Countries. A Panel Data Approach with Endogenous Regressors," GEMF Working Papers 2010-04, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    3. Raffaela Giordano & Sergi Lanau & Pietro Tommasino & Petia Topalova, 2015. "Does Public Sector Inefficiency Constrain Firm Productivity; Evidence from Italian Provinces," IMF Working Papers 15/168, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Bogetoft, Peter & Heinesen, Eskil & Tranæs, Torben, 2015. "The efficiency of educational production: A comparison of the Nordic countries with other OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 310-321.
    5. repec:eur:ejesjr:49 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Francesco Grigoli & Eduardo Ley, 2012. "Quality of Government and Living Standards; Adjusting for the Efficiency of Public Spending," IMF Working Papers 12/182, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Giuseppe Coco & Raffaele Lagravinese, 2012. "Incentive Effects on Efficiency in Education Systems’ Performance," Working Papers 270, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Manabu Nose, 2015. "Estimation of Drivers of Public Education Expenditure; Baumol’s Effect Revisited," IMF Working Papers 15/178, International Monetary Fund.
    9. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10797-016-9410-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Djedje Hermann Yohou, 2015. "In Search of Fiscal Space in Africa: The Role of the Quality of Government Spending," Working Papers halshs-01222812, HAL.
    11. Azar Dufrechou, Paola, 2016. "The efficiency of public education spending in Latin America: A comparison to high-income countries," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 188-203.
    12. Victoria Gunnarsson & Etibar Jafarov, 2008. "Government Spending on Health Care and Education in Croatia; Efficiency and Reform Options," IMF Working Papers 08/136, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Expenditure efficiency; Education; Government expenditures; Health care; Public sector; Wages; health sector reform; education sector reform; G7; health spending; public health; infant mortality; health status;

    JEL classification:

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/263. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow) or (Hassan Zaidi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imfffus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.