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What Drives China’s Growing Role in Africa?

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  • Jian-Ye Wang

Abstract

What role does China play in Africa's development? What drives China's increasing economic involvement in the continent? This paper attempts to provide a quantified assessment of China's multifaceted influence as market, donor, financer and investor, and contractor and builder. Though in the past official development aid predominated, the paper argues that government policies, markets for each other's exports, Africa's demand for infrastructure, and differences in China's approach to financing have together moved commercial activities-trade and investment-to the center of China-Africa economic relations. While China's public sector, state financial institutions in particular, has been instrumental in the process, the influence of its private sector is increasing. Implications for the future of China-Africa economic relations are briefly noted.

Suggested Citation

  • Jian-Ye Wang, 2007. "What Drives China’s Growing Role in Africa?," IMF Working Papers 07/211, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/211
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. World Economic Forum & World Bank & African Development Bank, 2007. "The Africa Competitiveness Report 2007," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6612, August.
    2. Andrea Goldstein & Nicolas Pinaud & Helmut Reisen, 2006. "The Rise of China and India: What's in it for Africa?," OECD Development Centre Policy Insights 19, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yin-Wong Cheung & Xingwang Qian, 2009. "The Empirics of China's Outward Direct Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2621, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Nihal Bayraktar, 2017. "Impacts Of Africa'S Total And Commodity-Based Trade With China And Oecd Countries†," Eurasian Journal of Economics and Finance, Eurasian Publications, vol. 5(1), pages 95-113.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:243-261 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Riccardo Fiorentini & Guido Montani, 2012. "The New Global Political Economy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14443.
    5. Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck & Barslund, Mikkel & Hansen, Casper Worm & Harr, Thomas & Jensen, Peter Sandholt, 2014. "How much did China's WTO accession increase economic growth in resource-rich countries?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 16-26.
    6. repec:eee:chieco:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:258-268 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ratha, Dilip & Mohapatra, Sanket & Plaza, Sonia, 2008. "Beyond aid : new sources and innovative mechanisms for financing development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4609, The World Bank.
    8. Suhas Ketkar & Dilip Ratha, 2009. "Innovative Financing for Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6549, August.
    9. Mary-Françoise Renard, 2011. "Working Paper 126 - China’s Trade and FDI in Africa," Working Paper Series 297, African Development Bank.
    10. Jean-Raphaël Chaponnière & Emmanuel Comole & Pierre Jacquet, 2009. "Les pays émergents et l’aide au développement," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 95(2), pages 173-188.

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    Keywords

    Capital flows; Aid; Africa; Development assistance; China; Trade; loans; debt; debt relief; terms of trade; interest;

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