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Welfare Gains from Financial Liberalization

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  • Kenichi Ueda
  • Robert M. Townsend

Abstract

Financial liberalization has been a controversial issue as there is little empirical evidence for its positive effects on economic growth. However, we find sizable welfare gains, 1 to 28 percent of permanent consumption though, consistent with the literature, the gain in the economic growth is ambiguous, -0.2 to 0.7 percent. We apply a canonical growth model with endogenous financial deepening to Thailand, 1976-96. As effective bank transaction costs decline, more people take advantage of financial services. We estimate the gains by comparing model simulations under the historical episode of financial liberalization to those under a hypothetical continuation of financial repression.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenichi Ueda & Robert M. Townsend, 2007. "Welfare Gains from Financial Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 07/154, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/154
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    Cited by:

    1. Bonfiglioli, Alessandra, 2008. "Financial integration, productivity and capital accumulation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 337-355, December.
    2. Kenichi Ueda, 2008. "Life Expectancy and Income Convergence in the World; A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," IMF Working Papers 08/158, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Enrica Detragiache & Gianni De Nicolo & Senay Agca, 2007. "Financial Reforms, Financial Openness, and Corporate Borrowing; International Evidence," IMF Working Papers 07/186, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Claessens, Stijn & Ueda, Kenichi & Yafeh, Yishay, 2014. "Institutions and financial frictions: Estimating with structural restrictions on firm value and investment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 107-122.
    5. Harold L. Cole & Jeremy Greenwood & Juan M. Sanchez, 2016. "Why Doesn't Technology Flow From Rich to Poor Countries?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 84, pages 1477-1521, July.
    6. Jeremy Greenwood & Juan Sanchez & Cheng Wang, 2013. "Quantifying the Impact of Financial Development on Economic Development," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(1), pages 194-215, January.
    7. Alexander Karaivanov & Sonia Ruano & Jesús Saurina & Robert Townsend, 2010. "No bank, one bank, several banks: does it matter for investment?," Working Papers 1003, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    8. Sanchita Mukherjee & Rina Bhattacharya, 2011. "Inflation Targeting and Monetary Policy Transmission Mechanisms in Emerging Market Economies," IMF Working Papers 11/229, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Alem, Mauro & Townsend, Robert M., 2014. "An evaluation of financial institutions: Impact on consumption and investment using panel data and the theory of risk-bearing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 183(1), pages 91-103.
    10. Kym Anderson, 2012. "Costing Global Trade Barriers, 1900 to 2050," Departmental Working Papers 2012-08, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    11. Guven, Cahit, 2016. "Financial integration: The role of tradable and non-tradable goods," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 345-353.
    12. Ziv Chinzara & Radhika Lahiri, 2012. "Financial Intermediation and Costly Technology Adoption under Uncertainty: A Political Economy Perspective," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 295, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.

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    Keywords

    Economic growth; Economic models; Financial systems; Financial sector; Thailand; financial liberalization; welfare gain; financial deepening; gdp growth; financial system; growth rate;

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