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Modalities of Moving to Inflation Targeting in Armenia and Georgia


  • International Monetary Fund


This paper reviews the current monetary and exchange rate policy frameworks in Armenia and Georgia, and the challenges associated with the choice of a credible nominal anchor in the context of large nominal and real shocks. The paper makes a case for a gradual transition to full-fledged inflation targeting (FFIT) in both countries in the medium term. The implications of this option are examined from various angles. In particular, the monetary transmission mechanisms and compliance with major institutional prerequisites for successful FFIT adoption are analyzed. Based on this analysis, the paper identifies a series of short- and medium-term recommendations, drawing on the experience of emerging market countries that successfully moved to FFIT.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 2007. "Modalities of Moving to Inflation Targeting in Armenia and Georgia," IMF Working Papers 07/133, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/133

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. Jean-Jacques Hallaert, 2008. "How does a domestic tax reform affect protection against imports? The case of the Republic of Madagascar," IMF Working Papers 08/151, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jenish Nurbek & Kyrgyzbaeva Asel, 2012. "On the Possibility of Inflation Targeting in Kyrgyzstan," EERC Working Paper Series 12/10e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    2. Al-Mashat Rania & Billmeier Andreas, 2008. "The Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Egypt," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 4(3), pages 32-82, September.
    3. Stephanie Medina Cas & Alejandro Carrion-Menendez & Florencia Frantischek, 2011. "The Policy Interest-Rate Pass-Through in Central America," IMF Working Papers 11/240, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Poghosyan, Karen & Boldea, Otilia, 2013. "Structural versus matching estimation: Transmission mechanisms in Armenia," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 136-148.
    5. Marek Dabrowski, 2008. "Policy Challenges Faced by Low-Income CIS Economies," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0375, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Poghosyan, K., 2012. "Structural and reduced-form modeling and forecasting with application to Armenia," Other publications TiSEM ad1a24c3-15e6-4f04-b338-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    7. Ara Stepanyan & Era Dabla-Norris & Ashot Anatolii Mkrtchyan, 2009. "A New Keynesian Model of the Armenian Economy," IMF Working Papers 09/66, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Aliyu, Shehu Usman Rano & Englama, Abwaku, 2009. "Is Nigeria Ready for Inflation Targeting?," MPRA Paper 14870, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 26 Apr 2009.
    9. Giorgi Bakradze & Andreas Billmeier, 2007. "Inflation Targeting in Georgia; Are We There Yet?," IMF Working Papers 07/193, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Dabrowski, Marek, 2013. "Monetary policy regimes in CIS economies and their ability to provide price and financial stability," BOFIT Discussion Papers 8/2013, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    11. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "The Transmission Mechanism in Armenia; New Evidence from a Regime Switching VAR Analysis," IMF Working Papers 10/270, International Monetary Fund.

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    Armenia; Inflation targeting; Georgia; Monetary policy; inflation; central bank; monetary fund;

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