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Distributional Effects of Oil Price Changeson Household Expenditures; Evidence From Mali

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  • Kangni R Kpodar

Abstract

Using an input-output approach, this paper assesses the distributional effects of a rise in various petroleum product prices in Mali. The results show that, although rising gasoline and diesel prices affect mainly nonpoor households, rising kerosene prices are most harmful to the poor. Overall, the impact of fuel prices on household budgets displays a U-shaped relationship with expenditure per capita. Regardless of the oil product considered, highincome households would benefit disproportionately from oil price subsidies. This suggests that a petroleum price subsidy is an ineffective mechanism for protecting the income of poor households compared with a targeted subsidy.

Suggested Citation

  • Kangni R Kpodar, 2006. "Distributional Effects of Oil Price Changeson Household Expenditures; Evidence From Mali," IMF Working Papers 06/91, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/91
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Abbas Valadkhani & William F. Mitchell, 2002. "Assessing the Impact of Changes in Petroleum Prices on Inflation and Household Expenditures in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(2), pages 122-132.
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    Cited by:

    1. Plante, Michael, 2014. "The long-run macroeconomic impacts of fuel subsidies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 129-143.
    2. Nathan S. Balke, Michael Plante, and Mine Yücel, 2015. "Fuel Subsidies, the Oil Market and the World Economy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Adelman S).
    3. Diagne, Youssoupha S & Diop, Mouhamadou M, 2007. "Quelles solutions à la hausse continue de la facture publique pétrolière : maintien des appuis à la consommation ou libre fixation des prix par le marché ?
      [Impact of energy subsidies withdrawal on
      ," MPRA Paper 54807, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Rodriguez, U-Primo E., 2007. "State-of-the-Art in Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modelling with a Case Study of the Philippines," Agricultural Economics Research Review, Agricultural Economics Research Association (India), vol. 20(1), pages 1-28.
    5. Jiang, Zhujun & Ouyang, Xiaoling & Huang, Guangxiao, 2015. "The distributional impacts of removing energy subsidies in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 111-122.
    6. Ashokankur Datta, 2008. "The incidence of fuel taxation in India," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 08-05, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
    7. AydIn, Levent & Acar, Mustafa, 2011. "Economic impact of oil price shocks on the Turkish economy in the coming decades: A dynamic CGE analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1722-1731, March.
    8. Datta, Ashokankur, 2010. "The incidence of fuel taxation in India," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(Supplemen), pages 26-33, September.
    9. Soile, Ismail & Mu, Xiaoyi, 2015. "Who benefit most from fuel subsidies? Evidence from Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 314-324.
    10. Plante, Michael, 2014. "The long-run macroeconomic impacts of fuel subsidies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 129-143.
    11. Mathew Adagunodo, 2013. "Petroleum Products Pricing Reform in Nigeria: Welfare Analysis from Household Budget Survey," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(4), pages 459-472.

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