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Does Inflation in China Affect the United States and Japan?

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  • Luke B Willard
  • Tarhan Feyzioglu

Abstract

With China's share in global trade increasing rapidly, some argued in 2002-03 that China was exporting deflation to other countries as it was dumping cheap goods in mature markets. Later, others argued that China was sucking in commodities and thus causing sharp increases in global prices. The theoretical literature so far has provided mixed conclusions regarding the strength of international transmission of inflation. This paper uses a number of econometric techniques to assess the extent of the link between inflation rates between China and the United States and Japan. It finds only limited empirical evidence at the aggregate level for consumer price inflation in China leading to price changes in the United States and Japan. However, it finds some evidence that inflation in the United States has an impact on Chinese inflation, consistent with the literature that argues that inflation is propagated from the reserve currency economy to other economies. In either case, the impact is short lived. At a more disaggregate level, there appears to be stronger sector-specific linkages between prices in China and in the United States and Japan, both for food and at the household level for manufactured goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Luke B Willard & Tarhan Feyzioglu, 2006. "Does Inflation in China Affect the United States and Japan?," IMF Working Papers 06/36, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/36
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. He, Qichun & Zou, Heng-fu, 2016. "Does inflation cause growth in the reform-era China? Theory and evidence," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 470-484.
    2. Auer, Raphael & Fischer, Andreas M., 2010. "The effect of low-wage import competition on U.S. inflationary pressure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 491-503, May.
    3. Carsten A Holz & Aaron Mehrotra, 2013. "Wage and price dynamics in a large emerging economy: The case of China," BIS Working Papers 409, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Denise Côté & Carlos de Resende, 2008. "Globalization and Inflation: The Role of China," Staff Working Papers 08-35, Bank of Canada.
    5. Juan Carlos Berganza & Pedro del Río & Fructuoso Borrallo, 2016. "Determinants and implications of low global inflation rates," Occasional Papers 1608, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.
    6. Pym Manopimoke & Wanicha Direkudomsak, 2015. "Thai Inflation Dynamics in a Globalized Economy," PIER Discussion Papers 11., Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Nov 2015.
    7. Kitov, Ivan & KItov, Oleg, 2013. "Inflation, unemployment, and labor force. Phillips curves and long-term projections for Japan," MPRA Paper 49388, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Eickmeier, Sandra & Kühnlenz, Markus, 2013. "China's role in global inflation dynamics," Discussion Papers 07/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    9. Lewis, John & Saleheen, Jumana, 2014. "Tailwinds from the East: how has the rising share of imports from emerging markets affected import prices?," Bank of England working papers 506, Bank of England.
    10. Claudio E. V. Borio & Andrew Filardo, 2007. "Globalisation and inflation: New cross-country evidence on the global determinants of domestic inflation," BIS Working Papers 227, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Granville, Brigitte & Mallick, Sushanta & Zeng, Ning, 2011. "Chinese exchange rate and price effects on G3 import prices," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 427-440.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Deflation; Economic models; Inflation; Japan; Trade; United States; inflation rates; price inflation; monetary fund; price level; Open Economy Macroeconomics;

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