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Trade Liberalization, Macroeconomic Adjustment, and Welfare; Unifying Trade and Macro Models

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  • Ehsan U. Choudhri
  • Hamid Faruqee
  • Stephen Tokarick

Abstract

Trade liberalization leads to long-run gains, but it can also involve costly short-run macroeconomic adjustment. The paper explores the relative importance of these effects within a dynamic general equilibrium model that captures key elements of both international trade and macroeconomic models. The welfare effect of trade liberalization is decomposed into a steady-state efficiency gain and a transitional loss associated with wage-price stickiness. Our estimates show that the transitional loss is small relative to the steady-state gain, and tends to be lower under flexible as compared to fixed exchange rates. We also show that the loss can be reduced further by a flexible price-level targeting policy rule.

Suggested Citation

  • Ehsan U. Choudhri & Hamid Faruqee & Stephen Tokarick, 2006. "Trade Liberalization, Macroeconomic Adjustment, and Welfare; Unifying Trade and Macro Models," IMF Working Papers 06/304, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/304
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maurice Obstfeld, 2004. "Globalization, Macroeconomic Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies," NBER Working Papers 10849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Obstfeld, Maurice, 2004. "Globalization, Macroeconomic Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies: Keynote Speech," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 22(S1), pages 29-55, December.
    3. V. V Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2002. "Can Sticky Price Models Generate Volatile and Persistent Real Exchange Rates?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(3), pages 533-563.
    4. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-1176, December.
    5. Bayoumi, Tamim & Laxton, Douglas & Pesenti, Paolo, 2004. "Benefits and spillovers of greater competition in Europe: a macroeconomic assessment," Working Paper Series 341, European Central Bank.
    6. Russell S. Boyer, 1977. "Commercial Policy under Alternative Exchange Rate Regimes," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 10(2), pages 218-232, May.
    7. Laxton, Douglas & Pesenti, Paolo, 2003. "Monetary rules for small, open, emerging economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1109-1146, July.
    8. Aasim M. Husain & Ashoka Mody & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "Exchange Rate Regime Durability and Performance in Developing Countries Versus Advanced Economies," NBER Working Papers 10673, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Sunghyun H. & Kose, M. Ayhan, 2014. "Welfare implications of trade liberalization and fiscal reform: A quantitative experiment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 198-209.

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