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Assessing Competitiveness After Conflict; The Case of the Central African Republic

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  • Mark W Lewis
  • Jean-Claude Nachega
  • Said A Bakhache
  • Kadima D. Kalonji

Abstract

This paper assesses competitiveness in the case of the Central African Republic, a postconflict country. The paper presents several conventional techniques for assessing competitiveness, namely the real exchange rate and recent trade performance. Several other measures are considered, in particular transport costs and governance measures, which may be more effective in capturing the obstacles to competitiveness posed by the poor security environment and weak institutions common to many post-conflict situations. The real exchange measure and trade measures suggest some mild erosion of competitiveness in recent years, while the other measures indicate that the competitiveness challenges faced by the Central African Republic are much deeper.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark W Lewis & Jean-Claude Nachega & Said A Bakhache & Kadima D. Kalonji, 2006. "Assessing Competitiveness After Conflict; The Case of the Central African Republic," IMF Working Papers 06/303, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/303
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 691-751, September.
    2. Hinkle, Lawrence E. & Monteil, Peter J. (ed.), 1999. "Exchange Rate Misalignment: Concepts and Measurement for Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195211269.
    3. John Williamson, 1994. "Estimating Equilibrium Exchange Rates," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 17.
    4. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    5. Limao, Nuno & Venables, Anthony J., 1999. "Infrastructure, geographical disadvantage, and transport costs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2257, The World Bank.
    6. Michael Faye & John McArthur & Jeffrey Sachs & Thomas Snow, 2004. "The Challenges Facing Landlocked Developing Countries," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 31-68.
    7. Ronald Macdonald & Luca Antonio Ricci, 2004. "Estimation Of The Equilibrium Real Exchange Rate For South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(2), pages 282-304, June.
    8. Johan Mathisen, 2003. "Estimation of the Equilibrium Real Exchange Rate for Malawi," IMF Working Papers 03/104, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Dhaneshwar Ghura & Benoît Mercereau, 2004. "Political Instability and Growth; The Central African Republic," IMF Working Papers 04/80, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark W Lewis & Aurelie Martin & Gabriel Di Bella, 2007. "Assessing Competitiveness and Real Exchange Rate Misalignment in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 07/201, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Ken Miyajima, 2007. "What Do We Know About Namibia’s Competitiveness?," IMF Working Papers 07/191, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Competition; Central African Republic; Foreign exchange; Governance; Transport; Trade; Competitiveness; transport costs; exchange rate; exchange rates; transport cost; real exchange rates; Economywide Country Studies: Africa;

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