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Does Import Protection Discourage Exports?


  • Stephen Tokarick


This paper points out that while many developing countries seek to increase their export earnings, they have not embraced fully the notion that their own pattern of import protection hurts their export performance. The paper quantifies the extent to which import protection acts as a tax on a country's export sector and finds that for many developing countries, the magnitude of the implicit tax is substantial-about 12 percent, on average, for the countries studied. The paper also illustrates the effects of various tariff-cutting scenarios in the Doha Round on export incentives and concludes that, in general, developing countries could increase their export earnings by reducing their own import tariffs, but countries must be careful about how these tariff reductions are achieved. For example, tariff-cutting schemes that exempt certain sectors could actually be harmful.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Tokarick, 2006. "Does Import Protection Discourage Exports?," IMF Working Papers 06/20, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/20

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ianchovichina, Elena, 2004. "Trade policy analysis in the presence of duty drawbacks," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 353-371, April.
    2. Porto, Guido G., 2005. "Informal export barriers and poverty," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 447-470, July.
    3. Dawkins, Christina & Srinivasan, T.N. & Whalley, John, 2001. "Calibration," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 58, pages 3653-3703 Elsevier.
    4. K.W. Clements & L.A. Sjaastad, 1983. "How Protection Taxes Exporters," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 83-15, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Edward R. Gemayel & David A. Grigorian, 2006. "How Tight is Too Tight? A Look at Welfare Implications of Distortionary Policies in Uzbekistan," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 3(2), pages 239-261, December.
    2. Joseph Francis Francois & Miriam Manchin, 2013. "Lerner meets Gravity," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 123, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).
    3. Marjan Petreski & Branimir Jovanovic & Igor Velickovski, 2017. "Tariff-Induced (De)industrialization: An Empirical Analysis," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 59(3), pages 345-381, September.
    4. Branimir Jovanović & Marjan Petreski & Igor Velickovski, 2015. "Tariff-induced (de)industrialization in transition economies: A comparative analysis," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 116, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    5. International Monetary Fund, 2007. "Peru; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 07/53, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Stephane Becuwe & Bertrand Blancheton & Leo Charles & Matthieu Clement, 2015. "Asymmetric influence of distance on french international trade 1850-1913," EcoMod2015 8552, EcoMod.


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