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The International Effects of Government Spending Composition

  • Giovanni Ganelli

This paper helps resolve a paradox in the literature, noticed by Alesina and Perotti (1995), which is that, although government employment is an important component of public spending, the debate on the effects of fiscal policy focuses almost exclusively on shocks to non-wage government consumption. We incorporate the distinction between spending for government employment and spending for non-wage government consumption in a "new open economy macroeconomics" model. Our results show that a permanent reduction in public employment in one country reduces relative private consumption and appreciates the domestic exchange rate if it is matched by a reduction in taxes. When the reduction in public employment is used to finance increased non-wage government consumption, the macroeconomic effects results are ambiguous, and are affected by the initial level of the public wage bill.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 05/4.

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Length: 18
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:05/4
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  1. Lane, Philip R., 2001. "The new open economy macroeconomics: a survey," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 235-266, August.
  2. Andrew Mountford & Harald Uhlig, 2009. "What are the effects of fiscal policy shocks?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 960-992.
  3. Galí, Jordi & López-Salido, J David & Vallés Liberal, Javier, 2005. "Understanding the Effects of Government Spending on Consumption," CEPR Discussion Papers 5212, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Ganelli, Giovanni, 2005. "The new open economy macroeconomics of government debt," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 167-184, January.
  5. Lane, Philip R. & Perotti, Roberto, 2003. "The importance of composition of fiscal policy: evidence from different exchange rate regimes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(9-10), pages 2253-2279, September.
  6. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 1999. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," NBER Working Papers 7269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ganelli, G., 2000. "Useful Government Spending, Direct Crowding Out and Fiscal Policy Interdependence," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 547, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  8. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 624-60, June.
  9. Alberto Alesina & Roberto Perotti, 1995. "Fiscal Expansions and Fiscal Adjustments in OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 5214, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2005. "Rolling Back the Public Sector - Differential Effects on Unemployment, Investment and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 4896, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Finn, Mary G, 1998. "Cyclical Effects of Government's Employment and Goods Purchases," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 635-57, August.
  12. Fatás, Antonio & Mihov, Ilian, 2001. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy on Consumption and Employment: Theory and Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 2760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Ganelli, Giovanni & Lane, Philip R., 2002. "Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis: The Open Economy Dimension," CEPR Discussion Papers 3540, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Hau, Harald, 2000. "Exchange rate determination: The role of factor price rigidities and nontradeables," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 421-447, April.
  15. Roberto Perotti, 2002. "Estimating the effects of fiscal policy in OECD countries," Economics Working Papers 015, European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes.
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