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Russia's Regions; Income Volatility, Labor Mobility and Fiscal Policy

  • Goohoon Kwon
  • Antonio Spilimbergo

Russia's regions are heavily exposed to regional income shocks because of an uneven distribution of natural resources and a Soviet legacy of heavily skewed regional specialization. Also, Russia has a limited mobility of labor and lacks fiscal instruments to deal with regional shocks. We assess how these features influence the magnitude and persistence of regional income shocks, through a panel vector autoregression, drawing on extensive and unique regional data covering last decade. We find that labor mobility associated with regional shocks is far lower than in the United States yet higher than in the EU-15, and that regional expenditures tend to expand in booms and contract in recessions. We discuss institutional factors behind these outcomes and policy implications.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 05/185.

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Length: 19
Date of creation: 01 Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:05/185
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  1. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2003. "Migration and Regional Adjustment to Asymmetric Shocks in Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3798, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Desai, Raj M. & Freinkman, Lev & Goldberg, Itzhak, 2005. "Fiscal federalism in rentier regions: Evidence from Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 814-834, December.
  3. Eichengreen, Barry, 1993. "European Monetary Unification," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(3), pages 1321-57, September.
  4. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization Of The Dynamic Effects Of Changes In Government Spending And Taxes On Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368, November.
  5. Litwack, John M., 2002. "Central Control of Regional Budgets: Theory with Applications to Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 51-75, March.
  6. Boeri, Tito & Scarpetta, Stefano, 1996. "Regional mismatch and the transition to a market economy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 233-254, October.
  7. Antonio Spilimbergo & Eswar Prasad & Paolo Mauro, 1999. "Perspectives on Regional Unemployment in Europe," IMF Occasional Papers 177, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Yuri Andrienko & Sergei Guriev, 2003. "Determinants of interregional mobility in Russia: evidence from panel data," Working Papers w0027, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  9. Lavrov, Aleksei & Litwack, John & Sutherland, Douglas, 2001. "Fiscal federalist relations in Russia: a case for subnational autonomy," MPRA Paper 26537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Jorge Martinez-Vasquez & Jameson Boex, 2001. "Russia's Transition to a New Federalism," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15248, June.
  11. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2007. "Asymmetric Federalism in Russia: Cure or Poison?," Chapters, in: Fiscal Fragmentation in Decentralized Countries, chapter 8 Edward Elgar.
  12. Decressin, Jorg & Fatas, Antonio, 1995. "Regional labor market dynamics in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1627-1655, December.
  13. Bornhorst, Fabian & Commander, Simon, 2004. "Regional Unemployment and its Persistence in Transition Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 1074, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Poterba, James M, 1994. "State Responses to Fiscal Crises: The Effects of Budgetary Institutions and Politics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(4), pages 799-821, August.
  15. Maurice Obstfeld & Giovanni Peri, 1998. "Regional non-adjustment and fiscal policy," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 13(26), pages 205-259, 04.
  16. Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2000. "Incentives to provide local public goods: fiscal federalism, Russian style," Working Papers w0001, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  17. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  18. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
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