IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Bank Behavior in Developing Countries; Evidence from East Africa


  • Richard Podpiera
  • Martin Cihak


We analyze the structure, performance, and role of banking systems in the three member countries of the East African Community-Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda-against the backdrop of recent financial sector reforms. Focusing on the behavior of different types of banks, we find no support for the argument that the presence of large international banks would have an adverse effect on the effectiveness and efficiency of banking sectors in developing countries. International banks are generally more efficient and more active in lending than domestic banks. However, as suggested by the Kenyan experience, the presence of international banks may not lead to increased competition and provision of banking services if weak institutions are allowed to remain in the system.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Podpiera & Martin Cihak, 2005. "Bank Behavior in Developing Countries; Evidence from East Africa," IMF Working Papers 05/129, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:05/129

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barajas, Adolfo & Steiner, Roberto & Salazar, Natalia, 2000. "The impact of liberalization and foreign investment in Colombia's financial sector," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 157-196, October.
    2. Gianni De Nicolo & Patrick Honohan & Alain Ize, 2003. "Dollarization of the Banking System; Good or Bad?," IMF Working Papers 03/146, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Claude Barfield, 1996. "International Financial Markets," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 52695.
    4. Clarke, George R. G. & Cull, Robert & Martinez Peria, Maria Soledad, 2001. "Does foreign bank penetration reduce access to credit in developing countries"evidence from asking borrowers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2716, The World Bank.
    5. Petya Koeva Brooks, 2003. "The Performance of Indian Banks During Financial Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 03/150, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Ephraim W. Chirwa & Montfort Mlachila, 2002. "Financial Reforms and Interest Rate Spreads in the Commercial Banking System in Malawi," IMF Working Papers 02/6, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Beck, Thorsten & Fuchs, Michael, 2004. "Structural issues in the Kenyan financial system: improving competition and access," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3363, The World Bank.
    8. Claessens, Stijn & Demirguc-Kunt, Asl[iota] & Huizinga, Harry, 2001. "How does foreign entry affect domestic banking markets?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 891-911, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kessy, Pantaleo, 2011. "Dollarization in Tanzania: empirical evidence and cross-country experience," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 36381, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Laetitia Lepetit & Clovis Rugemintwari & Frank Strobel, 2015. "Monetary, Financial and Fiscal Stability in the East African Community: Ready for a Monetary Union?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(8), pages 1179-1204, August.
    3. Thorsten Beck & Michael Fuchs & Dorothe Singer & Makaio Witte, 2014. "Making Cross-Border Banking Work for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20248, June.
    4. Thorsten Beck & Samuel Munzele Maimbo & Issa Faye & Thouraya Triki, 2011. "Financing Africa : Through the Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2355.
    5. Kodongo, Odongo & Natto, Dinah & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2015. "Explaining cross-border bank expansion in East Africa," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 71-84.
    6. Beck, Thorsten & Hesse, Heiko, 2009. "Why are interest spreads so high in Uganda?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 192-204, March.
    7. International Monetary Fund, 2004. "Rwanda; Selected Issues and Statistical Appendix," IMF Staff Country Reports 04/383, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Hesse, Heiko, 2007. "Financial intermediation in the pre-consolidated banking sector in Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4267, The World Bank.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:05/129. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow) or (Hassan Zaidi). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.