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Migration and Foreign Remittances in the Philippines

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  • Robert M Burgess
  • V. Haksar

Abstract

International migration and large remittance flows have been prominent features of the Philippine economy for many decades. This paper describes the evolving pattern of migration and remittance flows and analyzes some of the channels through which remittances affect economic activity. The empirical evidence does not clearly support the purported short-term stabilizing effect on consumption of remittance flows. Furthermore, as in other countries, the longer term economic effect of such flows is ambiguous.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert M Burgess & V. Haksar, 2005. "Migration and Foreign Remittances in the Philippines," IMF Working Papers 05/111, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:05/111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A brain gain with a brain drain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 227-234, August.
    2. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    3. Robert E. B. Lucas, 2001. "Diaspora and Development: Highly Skilled Migrants from East Asia," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-120, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    4. Mohammed El Qorchi & Samuel Munzele Maimbo & John F. Wilson, 2003. "Informal Funds Transfer Systems; An Analysis of the Informal Hawala System," IMF Occasional Papers 222, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aubrey D. Tabuga, 2007. "International Remittances and Household Expenditures : The Philippine Case," Development Economics Working Papers 22698, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Ducanes, Geoffrey. & Abella, Manolo I., 2008. "Overseas Filipino workers and their impact on household employment decisions," ILO Working Papers 994112263402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Aysit Tansel & Pinar Yasar, 2010. "Macroeconomic impact of remittances on output growth: Evidence from Turkey," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 7(2), pages 132-143, October.
    4. Cristela Dakila & Francisco G. Dakila Jr., "undated". "Modeling the Impact of Overseas Filipino Workers Remittances on the Philippine Economy," EcoMod2006 272100014, EcoMod.
    5. Robert Shelburne & Jose Palacin, 2007. "Remittances in the CIS: Their Economic Implications and a New Estimation Procedure," ECE Discussion Papers Series 2007_5, UNECE.
    6. Alvin P. Ang, 2007. "Workers’ Remittances and Economic Growth in the Philippines," DEGIT Conference Papers c012_029, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    7. Leonardo Di Marco & Olga Marzovilla & Luciano Nieddu, 2015. "The Role Of Remittances On The Business Cycle: The Case Of The Philippines," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - Italian Review of Economics, Demography and Statistics, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 69(3), pages 119-130, July-Sept.
    8. Safaa Tabit & Charaf-Eddine Moussir, 2017. "Impact Of Migrants' Remittances On Economic Growth: Case Of Morocco," Post-Print hal-01449502, HAL.
    9. Luca Marchiori & Patrice Pieretti & Benteng Zo, 2008. "Brain Drain, Remittances, and Fertility," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 115, pages 9-42.
    10. Imad El Hamma, 2016. "Linking Remittances with Financial Development and Institutions: A Study from Selected MENA Countries," GREDEG Working Papers 2016-38, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    11. Qayyum, Abdul & Javid, Muhammad & Arif, Umaima, 2008. "Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth and Poverty: Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 22941, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2012. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries: Survey and analysis of direct and indirect effects," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 103-118.
    13. Edsel L. Beja Jr, 2011. "Do international remittances cause Dutch disease?," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 8(2), pages 132-140, October.

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