IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/imf/imfwpa/04-98.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Toward More Effective Redistribution; Reform Options for Intergovernmental Transfers in China

Author

Listed:
  • International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Full implementation of an intergovernmental transfer system based on revenue capacities and expenditure needs could significantly improve both redistribution and equity objectives of the Chinese authorities. This was envisaged in the 1994 fiscal reforms, but the authorities were unable to implement the measures fully. This paper examines mechanisms that might facilitate effective implementation.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 2004. "Toward More Effective Redistribution; Reform Options for Intergovernmental Transfers in China," IMF Working Papers 04/98, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:04/98
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=17364
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. West, Loraine A & Wong, Christine P W, 1995. "Fiscal Decentralization and Growing Regional Disparities in Rural China: Some Evidence in the Provision of Social Services," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 70-84, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chunli Shen & Jing Jin & Heng-fu Zou, 2012. "Fiscal Decentralization in China: History, Impact, Challenges and Next Steps," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 13(1), pages 1-51, May.
    2. Uchimura, Hiroko & Jütting, Johannes P., 2009. "Fiscal Decentralization, Chinese Style: Good for Health Outcomes?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1926-1934, December.
    3. Ahmad, Ehtisham, 2011. "Should China revisit the 1994 fiscal reforms?," Discussion Papers 115922, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    4. Ahmad, Ehtisham, 2011. "Should China revisit the 1994 fiscal reforms?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57969, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Allers, Maarten & Merkus, Erik, 2013. "Soft budget constraint but no moral hazard? The Dutch local government bailout puzzle," Research Report 13014-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    6. Richard Bird & Christine C.P.Wong, 2005. "China's Fiscal System: A Work in Progress (2005)," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0520, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    7. Yongzheng Liu & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Baoyun Qiao, 2014. "Falling Short: Intergovernmental Transfers in China," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1423, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    8. Era Dabla-Norris, 2005. "Issues in Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations in China," IMF Working Papers 05/30, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Huang, Bihong & Chen, Kang, 2012. "Are intergovernmental transfers in China equalizing?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 534-551.
    10. Mihaela Bronic, 2010. "Evaluating the current equalization grant to counties in Croatia," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 34(1), pages 25-52.
    11. repec:dgr:rugsom:13014-eef is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Christine C.P. Wong & Richard M. Bird, 2005. "China?s Fiscal System: A Work in Progress," International Tax Program Papers 0515, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Fiscal policy; Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations; expenditure; expenditure needs; expenditures; total expenditure; tax effort;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:04/98. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow) or (Hassan Zaidi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imfffus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.