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Comesa and Sadc; Prospects and Challenges for Regional Trade Integration


  • Padamja Khandelwal


Regional integration has been seen in Africa as a means of encouraging trade and securing economies of scale. This paper examines in detail the prospects and challenges for trade expansion in the two most prominent arrangements in eastern and southern Africa: the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC). It finds that possibilities of growth in intraregional trade may be limited, but that the two arrangements offer opportunities for member countries to gain policy credibility for trade reforms and tariff liberalization and to address structural weaknesses. In this regard, the negotiation of the Economic Partnership Agreements with the European Union can also have a significant impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Padamja Khandelwal, 2004. "Comesa and Sadc; Prospects and Challenges for Regional Trade Integration," IMF Working Papers 04/227, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:04/227

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Romain Wacziarg & Karen Horn Welch, 2008. "Trade Liberalization and Growth: New Evidence," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 187-231, June.
    2. Reint Gropp & Liam P. Ebrill & Janet Gale Stotsky, 1999. "Revenue Implications of Trade Liberalization," IMF Occasional Papers 180, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Lawrence E. Hinkle & Maurice Schiff, 2004. "Economic Partnership Agreements Between Sub-Saharan Africa and the EU: A Development Perspective," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(9), pages 1321-1333, September.
    4. Jeffrey D. Lewis & Sherman Robinson & Karen Thierfelder, 2003. "Free Trade Agreements and the SADC Economies," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(2), pages 156-206, June.
    5. Robert E. Baldwin, 2004. "Openness and Growth: What's the Empirical Relationship?," NBER Chapters,in: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics, pages 499-526 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Baunsgaard, Thomas & Keen, Michael, 2010. "Tax revenue and (or?) trade liberalization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 563-577, October.
    7. Andrew Warner, 2003. "Once More into the Breach: Economic Growth and Integration," Working Papers 34, Center for Global Development.
    8. Arvind Subramanian, 2000. "Trade and Trade Policies in Eastern and Southern Africa," IMF Occasional Papers 196, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moshi Optat Herman & Kirsten Wandschneider & Thierry Warin & Phanindra Wunnava, 2011. "Southern African Economic Integration: Evidence from an Augmented Gravity Model," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 13(1), pages 1-13.
    2. Andrew Mold and Annalisa Prizzon, 2010. "Fragile States, Commodity Booms And Export Performance: An Analysis Of The Sub-Saharan African Case," RSCAS Working Papers 2010/21, European University Institute.
    3. Thierry Verdier, 2010. "Regional Integration, Fragility and Institution Building: An Analytical Framework Applied to the African Context," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 38, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "SOUTH AFRICA Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 05/345, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Walkenhorst, Peter, 2005. "Trade Policy Developments in Tanzania: The Challenge of Global and Regional Integration," MPRA Paper 23399, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Leo Frey & Ulrich Volz, 2013. "Regional Financial Integration In Sub-Saharan Africa – An Empirical Examination Of Its Effects On Financial Market Development," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(1), pages 79-117, March.
    7. Yongzheng Yang & Sanjeev Gupta, 2005. "Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa; Past Performance and the Way Forward," IMF Working Papers 05/36, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Meredith A McIntyre, 2005. "Trade Integration in the East African Community; An Assessment for Kenya," IMF Working Papers 05/143, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Michele Alessandrini & Michael Enowbi Batuo, 2010. "The trade specialization of SANE: Evidence from manufacturing industries," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 7(1), pages 145-178, June.
    10. Walkenhorst, Peter, 2006. "Uganda’s Access to Global and Regional Markets," MPRA Paper 23575, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Brenton, Paul & Saborowski, Christian & Staritz, Cornelia & von Uexkull, Erik, 2009. "Assessing the adjustment implications of trade policy changes using TRIST (tariff reform impact simulation tool)," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5045, The World Bank.
    12. Jean-Jacques Hallaert, 2007. "Can Regional Integration Accelerate Development in Africa? CGE Model Simulations of the Impact of the SADC FTA on the Republic of Madagascar," IMF Working Papers 07/66, International Monetary Fund.
    13. World Bank, 2008. "Middle East and North Africa Economic Developments and Prospects, 2008 : Regional Integration for Global Competitiveness," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12949, The World Bank.


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