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Can Higher Reserves Help Reduce Exchange Rate Volatility?

  • M. Nowak
  • Ketil Hviding
  • Luca Antonio Ricci

This paper studies the role of an increase in foreign exchange reserves in reducing currency volatility for emerging market countries. The study employs a panel of 28 countries over the period 1986-2002. Several control variables are introduced in the regressions to account for other factors affecting exchange rate volatility (monetary and external indicators as well as conventional macroeconomic fundamentals). The paper controls for the endogeneity induced by the role of the exchange rate regime, since the regime can affect both the level of reserves and exchange rate volatility. The results provide ample support for the proposition that holding adequate reserves reduces exchange rate volatility. The effect is strong and robust; moreover, it is nonlinear and appears to operate through a signaling effect.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 04/189.

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Length: 32
Date of creation: 01 Oct 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:04/189
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  1. Michael B. Devereux & Philip R. Lane, 2002. "Understanding Bilateral Exchange Rate Volatility," Trinity Economics Papers 200211, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48, February.
  3. Andrew K. Rose, 1994. "Are exchange rates macroeconomic phenomena?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 19-30.
  4. Roberto Rigobon, 2003. "Identification Through Heteroskedasticity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 777-792, November.
  5. Hasan, Shahriar & Wallace, Myles, 1996. "Real exchange rate volatility and exchange rate regimes: Evidence from long-term data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 67-73, July.
  6. Ricardo Hausmann & Ugo Panizza & Ernesto H. Stein, 2000. "Why Do Countries Float the Way They Float?," Research Department Publications 4205, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo, 2000. "When Capital Inflows Come to a Sudden Stop: Consequences and Policy Options," MPRA Paper 6982, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Gordon M. Bodnar & Leonardo Bartolini, 1995. "Are Exchange Rates Excessively Volatile? and What Does "Excessively Volatile" Mean, Anyway?," IMF Working Papers 95/85, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-76, December.
  10. Jaewoo Lee, 2004. "Insurance Value of International Reserves: An Option Pricing Approach," IMF Working Papers 04/175, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Caramazza, Francesco & Ricci, Luca & Salgado, Ranil, 2004. "International financial contagion in currency crises," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 51-70, February.
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