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China; Sources of Real Exchange Rate Fluctuations

  • Tao Wang
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    This paper reviews the evolution of China''s real effective exchange rate between 1980 and 2002, and uses a structural vector autoregression model to study the relative importance of different types of macroeconomic shocks for fluctuations in the real exchange rate. The structural decomposition shows that relative real demand and supply shocks account for most of the variations in real exchange rate changes during the estimation period. The paper also finds that supply shocks are as important as nominal shocks in accounting for real exchange rate fluctuations, in contrast with other studies that show that, in industrial countries, nominal shocks are more important in explaining real exchange rate fluctuations.

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    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=17115
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    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 04/18.

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    Length: 23
    Date of creation: 01 Feb 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:04/18
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    1. Matthew B. Canzoneri & Javier Vallés & José Viñals, 1996. "Do Exchange Rate Move to Address International Macroeconomic Imbalances?," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 9626, Banco de Espa�a.
    2. Bayoumi, Tamim & Eichengreen, Barry, 1992. "Macroeconomic Adjustment Under Bretton Woods and the Post-Bretton-Woods Float: An Impulse-Response Analysis," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4gf4d2hc, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Quah, Danny, 1989. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 655-73, September.
    4. Eswar Prasad & Bankim Chadha, 1996. "Real Exchange Rate Fluctuations and the Business Cycle; Evidence From Japan," IMF Working Papers 96/132, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Clarida, Richard & Gali, Jordi, 1994. "Sources of real exchange-rate fluctuations: How important are nominal shocks?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 1-56, December.
    6. Martin Eichenbaum & Charles Evans, 1992. "Some empirical evidence on the effects of monetary policy shocks on exchange rates," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 92-32, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    7. Zhang, Zhichao, 2001. "Real Exchange Rate Misalignment in China: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 80-94, March.
    8. Alun H. Thomas, 1997. "Is the Exchange Rate a Shock Absorber? the Case of Sweden," IMF Working Papers 97/176, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & McDermott, C John & Prasad, Eswar S, 2000. "Macroeconomic Fluctuations in Developing Countries: Some Stylized Facts," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 251-85, May.
    10. Dibooglu, Selahattin & Kutan, Ali M., 2000. "Sources of real exchange rate fluctuations in transition economies: The case of Ploand and Hungary," ZEI Working Papers B 14-2000, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies, University of Bonn.
    11. Ahmed, Shaghil, 2003. "Sources of economic fluctuations in Latin America and implications for choice of exchange rate regimes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 181-202, October.
    12. Hoffmaister, Alexander W. & Roldos, Jorge E., 2001. "The Sources of Macroeconomic Fluctuations in Developing Countries: Brazil and Korea," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 213-239, April.
    13. Chou, W. L. & Shih, Y. C., 1998. "The Equilibrium Exchange Rate of the Chinese Renminbi," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 165-174, March.
    14. Taimur Baig & Jörg Decressin & Tarhan Feyzioglu & Manmohan S. Kumar & Chris Faulkner-MacDonagh, 2003. "Deflation; Determinants, Risks, and Policy Options," IMF Occasional Papers 221, International Monetary Fund.
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