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Job-Specific Investment and the Cost of Dismissal Restrictions; The Case of Portugal

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  • H. Takizawa

Abstract

Using a search and matching labor market equilibrium model, this paper quantifies lost labor productivity and consumption per worker that emerges from the restrictions on dismissals. Dismissal restrictions hamper the efficient reallocation of workers, with workers remaining longer in jobs. But the restrictions also tend to induce job-specific investments. A calibration exercise applied to Portugal suggests that the restrictions on dismissal slow the pace of worker reallocation and cause substantial losses of labor productivity and consumption. Although lower worker mobility induces job-specific investment that offsets part of the labor productivity and consumption losses, the size of this offsetting effect is, at most, modest.

Suggested Citation

  • H. Takizawa, 2003. "Job-Specific Investment and the Cost of Dismissal Restrictions; The Case of Portugal," IMF Working Papers 03/75, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/75
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hogan, Seamus & Ragan, Christopher, 1998. "Job security with equilibrium unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 185-185, June.
    2. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    3. Pedro Portugal & Olivier Blanchard, 2001. "What Hides Behind an Unemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 187-207, March.
    4. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "Job reallocation, employment fluctuations and unemployment," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 18, pages 1171-1228 Elsevier.
    5. Belot, M.V.K. & Boone, J. & van Ours, J.C., 2002. "Welfare Effects of Employment Protection," Discussion Paper 2002-48, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. Olympia Bover & Pilar García-Perea & Pedro Portugal, 2000. "Labour market outliers: Lessons from Portugal and Spain," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(31), pages 379-428, October.
    7. van Ours, J. C., 1991. "The efficiency of the Dutch labour market in matching unemployment and vacancies," Other publications TiSEM 4bbea82e-68fb-45e0-b32a-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    8. Oliver Jean Blanchard & Peter Diamond, 1989. "The Beveridge Curve," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 20(1), pages 1-76.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kenichi Ueda & Stijn Claessen, 2016. "Monopoly Rights and Economic Growth: An Inverted U-Shaped Relation," CARF F-Series CARF-F-396, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    2. UEDA Kenichi & Stijn CLAESSENS, 2016. "Monopoly Rights and Economic Growth: An inverted U-shaped relation," Discussion papers 16093, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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