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The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) Opportunities and Challenges


  • Saleh M. Nsouli
  • Norbert Funke


This paper reviews major issues involved in achieving the objectives of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD). Using a simple framework for evaluation, the analysis highlights considerations relevant to policymakers in the areas of poverty reduction, macroeconomic policies, trade promotion, attracting capital flows, and governance and institutional reforms. The analysis also identifies risks involved in achieving NEPAD's objectives. To minimize these risks, it will be important to make some goals more operational, to further broaden and deepen stakeholder participation, to establish a sound basis for monitoring progress, to prepare contingency plans, and to harmonize the role of regional institutions with NEPAD initiatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Saleh M. Nsouli & Norbert Funke, 2003. "The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) Opportunities and Challenges," IMF Working Papers 03/69, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/69

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Norbert Funke & Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln, 2001. "Stock Market Liberalizations; Financial and Macroeconomic Implications," IMF Working Papers 01/193, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Odili Okwuchukwu, 2015. "Exchange Rate Volatility, Stock Market Performance and Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 5(2), pages 172-184, April.
    2. Pies, Ingo & Voigt, Cora, 2004. "Demokratie in Afrika - Eine wirtschaftsethische Stellungnahme zur Initiative "New Partnership for Africa's Development" (NePAD)," Discussion Papers 2004-2, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Chair of Economic Ethics.
    3. Kazeem Bello AJIDE & P.B. EREGHA, 2014. "Economic Freedom And Foreign Direct Investment In Ecowas Countries: A Panel Data Analysis," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(2).


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