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Are Pegged and Intermediate Regimes More Crisis Prone?

  • Andrea Bubula
  • Inci Ötker

This paper provides evidence on the susceptibility of different types of exchange rate regimes to currency crises during 1990-2001. It explores the incidence of crises, identified as episodes of severe exchange market pressure, to seek evidence on whether pegged regimes are more crisis prone than floating regimes and on whether certain types of pegged regimes are more crisis prone than others. The paper finds that pegged regimes, as a whole, have been characterized by a higher incidence of crises than floating regimes, for countries that are more integrated with international capital markets; and that intermediate regimes (mainly soft pegs and tightly-managed floating regimes) have been more crisis prone than both hard pegs and other floating regimes-a view consistent with the bipolar view of exchange rate regimes. The degree of crisis proneness seems to be broadly similar across different types of intermediate regimes.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 03/223.

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Length: 36
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/223
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