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Promoting Fiscal Transparency the Complementary Roles of the Imf, Financial Markets and Civil Society

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  • Murray Petrie

Abstract

This paper explores initiatives to date by the IMF, financial markets, and civil society organizations to assess and utilize information on fiscal transparency. The results of surveys and interviews of rating agency analysts and surveys of civil society organizations on their level of awareness of, and use of IMF fiscal transparency assessments are presented. The paper then considers the relative roles of the IMF, the private sector, and civil society organizations in assessing and promoting fiscal transparency, and the scope for greater complementarity among their roles. The paper concludes with a number of suggestions for making the IMF's fiscal transparency initiatives more effective.

Suggested Citation

  • Murray Petrie, 2003. "Promoting Fiscal Transparency the Complementary Roles of the Imf, Financial Markets and Civil Society," IMF Working Papers 03/199, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "An Introduction," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(2), pages 149-150, August.
    2. George Kopits & J. D. Craig, 1998. "Transparency in Government Operations," IMF Occasional Papers 158, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Murray Petrie & Richard Hemming, 2000. "A Framework for Assessing Fiscal Vulnerability," IMF Working Papers 00/52, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Ashok Vir Bhatia, 2002. "Sovereign Credit Ratings Methodology; An Evaluation," IMF Working Papers 02/170, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicoló Andreula & Alberto E. Chong & Jorge Guillén, 2009. "Institutional Quality and Fiscal Transparency," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1663, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. James E. Alt & David Dreyer Lassen & Shanna Rose, 2006. "The Causes of Fiscal Transparency: Evidence from the American States," EPRU Working Paper Series 06-02, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    3. Nicoló Andreula & Alberto Chong, 2016. "Do good institutions improve fiscal transparency?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 241-263, August.
    4. Bedri Peci, 2016. "Fiscal Transparency In Theory And Practice: The Case Of Kosovo," International Journal of Business and Management, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences, vol. 4(4), pages 78-91, November.
    5. Rafal Benecki & Jens Hölscher & Mariusz Jarmuzek, 2006. "Fiscal Transparency and Policy Rules in Poland," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0327, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Wehner, Joachim & de Renzio, Paolo, 2013. "Citizens, Legislators, and Executive Disclosure: The Political Determinants of Fiscal Transparency," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 96-108.
    7. Elif Arbatli & Julio Escolano, 2015. "Fiscal Transparency, Fiscal Performance and Credit Ratings," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 36, pages 237-270, June.
    8. International Monetary Fund, 2004. "Republic of Kazakhstan; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 04/362, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Benu Schneider, 2005. "Do Global Standards And Codes Prevent Financial Crises? Some Proposals On Modifying The Standards-Based Approach," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 177, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.

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