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Foreign Aid and Revenue Response; Does the Composition of Aid Matter?


  • Alexander Pivovarsky
  • Benedict J. Clements
  • Sanjeev Gupta
  • Erwin H Tiongson


This paper examines the revenue response to inflows of foreign aid in 107 countries during the period 1970–2000, In particular, it investigates whether the impact of aid on the revenue effort depends on the composition of aid (grants vis-à-vis loans). The results indicate that while concessional loans are associated with higher domestic revenue mobilization, the opposite is true of grants. On average, the dampening effect of grants on the revenue effort is modest. However, for those countries plagued by high levels of corruption, our results suggest that the decline in revenues completely offsets the increase in grants. The results are robust to various specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Pivovarsky & Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Erwin H Tiongson, 2003. "Foreign Aid and Revenue Response; Does the Composition of Aid Matter?," IMF Working Papers 03/176, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/176

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christopher S. Adam & David L. Bevan, 2006. "Aid and the Supply Side: Public Investment, Export Performance, and Dutch Disease in Low-Income Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 261-290.
    2. Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Aid and Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really Show?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 643-665, November.
    3. Mahbub Morshed, A. K. M. & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2004. "Sectoral adjustment costs and real exchange rate dynamics in a two-sector dependent economy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 147-177, May.
    4. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    5. Henrik Hansen & Finn Tarp, 2000. "Aid effectiveness disputed," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 375-398, April.
    6. Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Henrik Hansen & Finn Tarp, 2004. "On The Empirics of Foreign Aid and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(496), pages 191-216, June.
    7. Arellano, Cristina & Bulír, Ales & Lane, Timothy & Lipschitz, Leslie, 2009. "The dynamic implications of foreign aid and its variability," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 87-102, January.
    8. Chatterjee, Santanu & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2007. "Foreign aid and economic growth: The role of flexible labor supply," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 507-533, September.
    9. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan, 2008. "Donor policy rules and aid effectiveness," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1895-1920, June.
    10. Chatterjee, Santanu & Sakoulis, Georgios & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2003. "Unilateral capital transfers, public investment, and economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 1077-1103, December.
    11. William Easterly & Ross Levine & David Roodman, 2004. "Aid, Policies, and Growth: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 774-780, June.
    12. Mwanza Nkusu, 2004. "Aid and the Dutch Disease in Low-Income Countries; Informed Diagnoses for Prudent Prognoses," IMF Working Papers 04/49, International Monetary Fund.
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