IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Trade Liberalization and Real Exchange Rate Movement

  • Xiangming Li
Registered author(s):

    Although theory suggests that the real exchange rate should depreciate after a credible trade liberalization but could appreciate temporarily with a noncredible one, little empirical evidence exists. Unlike existing studies that use either indirect tests or unreliable openness measures, this paper uses an event study based on carefully documented trade liberalization in 45 countries. The result shows that real exchange rates depreciate after countries open their economies to trade. In countries with multiple liberalization episodes, however, real exchange rates appreciate during early episodes, suggesting that partial or noncredible trade liberalizations are associated with real appreciation.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=16470
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 03/124.

    as
    in new window

    Length: 38
    Date of creation: 01 Jun 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/124
    Contact details of provider: Postal: International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC USA
    Phone: (202) 623-7000
    Fax: (202) 623-4661
    Web page: http://www.imf.org/external/pubind.htm
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/pubs/ord_info.htm

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Andriamananjara, Shuby & Nash, John, 1997. "Have trade policy reforms led to greater openness in developing countries : evidence from readily available trade data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1730, The World Bank.
    2. Robert E. Baldwin, 1989. "Measuring Nontariff Trade Policies," NBER Working Papers 2978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Willett:, Thomas D., 1986. "Exchange-rate volatility, international trade, and resource allocation: A perspective on recent research," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 5(1, Supple), pages S101-S112, March.
    4. Calvo, Guillermo A. & Drazen, Allan, 1998. "Uncertain Duration Of Reform," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(04), pages 443-455, December.
    5. Gerwin Bell & M. Zühtü Yücelik & Paul Duran & Saleh M. Nsouli & Sena Eken, 1993. "The Path to Convertibility and Growth; The Tunisian Experience," IMF Occasional Papers 109, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Guillermo A. Calvo & Allan Drazen, 1997. "Uncertain Duration of Reform: Dynamic Implications," NBER Working Papers 5925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Edward E. Leamer, 1988. "Measures of Openness," NBER Chapters, in: Trade Policy Issues and Empirical Analysis, pages 145-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Khan, Mohsin S. & Ostry, Jonathan D., 1992. "Response of the equilibrium real exchange rate to real disturbances in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(9), pages 1325-1334, September.
    9. Dani Rodrik, 1992. "The Limits of Trade Policy Reform in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 87-105, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:03/124. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow)

    or (Hassan Zaidi)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.