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Testing the Relationship Between Government Spending and Revenue; Evidence From GCC Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Qing Wang
  • Ugo Fasano-Filho

Abstract

The paper examines the direction of causality between total government expenditure and revenue in oil-dependent GCC countries by utilizing a cointegration and error-correction modeling framework, and by calculating a variance decomposition analysis. In addition, it presents impulse responses to shed light on the dynamic relation of expenditure to a revenue shock. The results confirm expectations that government spending follows oil revenue, suggesting a pro-cyclical expenditure policy to variations in oil revenue. To make budget expenditure less driven by revenue availability, the authorities could resort to a medium-term expenditure framework, so that expenditures can be planned and insulated from volatile short-term revenue availability.

Suggested Citation

  • Qing Wang & Ugo Fasano-Filho, 2002. "Testing the Relationship Between Government Spending and Revenue; Evidence From GCC Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/201, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:02/201
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ugo Fasano-Filho, 2000. "Review of the Experience with Oil Stabilization and Savings Funds in Selected Countries," IMF Working Papers 00/112, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    3. Baffes, John & Shah, Anwar, 1994. "Causality and comovement between taxes and expenditures: Historical evidence from Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 311-331, August.
    4. James Payne, 1997. "The tax-spend debate: the case of Canada," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(6), pages 381-386.
    5. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
    6. Rolando Ossowski & Steven A Barnett & James Daniel & Jeffrey M. Davis, 2001. "Stabilization and Savings Funds for Nonrenewable Resources," IMF Occasional Papers 205, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 2012. "Fiscal Institutions in Resource-Rich Economies: Lessons from Chile and Norway," Documentos de Trabajo 416, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    2. Dizaji, Sajjad Faraji, 2014. "The effects of oil shocks on government expenditures and government revenues nexus (with an application to Iran's sanctions)," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 299-313.
    3. Olusegun Akanbi, 2015. "Fiscal policy and current account in an oil-rich economy: the case of Nigeria," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1563-1585, June.
    4. Joseph Ntamatungiro, 2004. "Fiscal Sustainability in Heavily Indebted Countries Dependenton Nonrenewable Resources; The Case of Gabon," IMF Working Papers 04/30, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Bhaskara Rao & Maheshwar Rao, 2005. "Determinants Of Growth Rate: Some Methodological Issues With Data From Fiji," Macroeconomics 0509003, EconWPA.
    6. Ullah, Nazim, 2016. "The Relationship of Government Revenue and Government Expenditure: A case study of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 69123, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Cologni, Alessandro & Manera, Matteo, 2013. "Exogenous oil shocks, fiscal policies and sector reallocations in oil producing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 42-57.
    8. Damian C. NWOSU & Harrison O. OKAFOR, 2014. "Government Revenue and Expenditure in Nigeria: A Disaggregated Analysis," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(7), pages 877-892, July.
    9. Eita, Joel Hinaunye & Mbazima, Daisy, 2008. "The Causal Relationship Between Government Revenue and Expenditure in Namibia," MPRA Paper 9154, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Alessandro Cologni & Matteo Manera, 2011. "Exogenous Oil Shocks, Fiscal Policy and Sector Reallocations in Oil Producing Countries," Working Papers 2011.55, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    11. Paulo A Medas & Daria V Zakharova, 2009. "A Primeron Fiscal Analysis in Oil-Producing Countries," IMF Working Papers 09/56, International Monetary Fund.
    12. El Anshasy, Amany A. & Bradley, Michael D., 2012. "Oil prices and the fiscal policy response in oil-exporting countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 605-620.
    13. Chin-Hong Puah Author_Email: chpuah@feb.unimas.my & Evan Lau & Hui-Fern Teo, 2011. "Testing Budget Sustainability In Sarawak State," 2nd International Conference on Business and Economic Research (2nd ICBER 2011) Proceeding 2011-221, Conference Master Resources.
    14. Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2005. "The government revenue and government expenditure nexus: empirical evidence from nine Asian countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1203-1216, January.
    15. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan, 2006. "Government revenue and government expenditure nexus: evidence from developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 285-291.
    16. Obeng, Samuel, 2015. "A Causality Test of the Revenue-Expenditure Nexus in Ghana," MPRA Paper 63735, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Feb 2015.

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