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The Impact of Changes in Stock Prices and House Priceson Consumption in OECD Countries

  • Alexander Ludwig
  • Torsten Sløk

This paper quantifies the different impact of stock and house prices on consumption using data for 16 OECD countries. The analysis finds that the long-run impact of an increase in stock prices and house prices is in general higher in countries with a market-based financial system. The sensitivity of consumption to changes in stock wealth is about twice as large as the sensitivity to changes in housing wealth. Splitting the sample into the 1980s and 1990s shows that both countries with a market-based financial system and countries with a bank-based financial system moved toward a higher degree of responsiveness of consumption to changes in stock prices and house prices.

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Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 02/1.

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Length: 37
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:02/1
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  18. Davidson, James E H, et al, 1978. "Econometric Modelling of the Aggregate Time-Series Relationship between Consumers' Expenditure and Income in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(352), pages 661-92, December.
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