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The Size and Sustainability of Nigerian Current Account Deficits

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  • Olumuyiwa S Adedeji

Abstract

This paper uses an intertemporal model of the current account and macroeconomic indicators to examine the size and sustainability of Nigerian current account deficits over the 1960-97 period. The results indicate that the Nigerian economy appeared to satisfy its intertemporal budget constraint during this period. However there were years marked by excessive current account deficits. The results also support the view that current account deficits accompanied by macroeconomic instability and structural weaknesses can degenerate in to an external crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Olumuyiwa S Adedeji, 2001. "The Size and Sustainability of Nigerian Current Account Deficits," IMF Working Papers 01/87, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/87
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    2. Milesi-Ferreti, Gian Maria & Razin, Assaf, 1996. "Current account sustainability," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 34294, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. Sebastian Edwards & Julio Santaella, 1993. "Devaluation Controversies in the Developing Countries: Lessons from the Bretton Woods Era," NBER Chapters,in: A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods System: Lessons for International Monetary Reform, pages 405-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 1997. "Nigeria; Experience with Structural Adjustment," IMF Occasional Papers 148, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Cashin, Paul & McDermott, C John, 1998. "Are Australia's Current Account Deficits Excessive?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 74(227), pages 346-361, December.
    6. Stelios Makrydakis, 1999. "Consumption-smoothing and the excessiveness of Greece's current account deficits," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 183-209.
    7. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: An empirical treatment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-4), pages 351-366, November.
    8. Tim Callen & Paul Cashin, 1999. "Assessing External Sustainability in India," IMF Working Papers 99/181, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Ghosh, Atish R & Ostry, Jonathan D, 1995. "The Current Account in Developing Countries: A Perspective from the Consumption-Smoothing Approach," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(2), pages 305-333, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Benoît Mercereau, 2003. "The Role of Stock Markets in Current Account Dynamics; Evidence from the United States," IMF Working Papers 03/108, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Benoît Mercereau, 2004. "The Role of Stock Markets in Current Account Dynamics; a Time-Series Approach," IMF Working Papers 04/50, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Ayla Ogus & Niloufer Sohrabji, 2008. "On the optimality and sustainability of Turkey’s current account," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 543-568, November.
    4. Aristovnik, Aleksander, 2006. "The Determinants & Excessiveness of Current Account Deficits in Eastern Europe & the Former Soviet Union," MPRA Paper 483, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Gnimassoun, Blaise & Coulibaly, Issiaka, 2014. "Current account sustainability in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does the exchange rate regime matter?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 208-226.
    6. Sebastian Edwards, 2004. "Thirty Years of Current Account Imbalances, Current Account Reversals and Sudden Stops," NBER Working Papers 10276, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Apergis, Nicholas & Tsoumas, Chris, 2009. "A survey of the Feldstein-Horioka puzzle: What has been done and where we stand," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 64-76, June.
    8. O Okiti, 2003. "A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model with Terms of Trade Shocks: A Small Open Economy Case," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0333, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    9. Hamizun Ismail & Ahmad Baharumshah, 2008. "Malaysia’s current account deficits: an intertemporal optimization perspective," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 569-590, November.
    10. Aleksander Aristovnik, 2006. "How Excessive are External Imbalances in Selected Transition Countries?," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2006(3), pages 243-267.
    11. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:48:y:2003:i:01:n:s0217590803000591 is not listed on IDEAS

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