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International Trade and Poverty Alleviation

Author

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  • Geoffrey J Bannister

Abstract

Empirical studies suggest that trade reform has a positive effect on employment and income for the poor; however, there are winners and losers. If the transitional costs of trade liberalization fall disproportionately on the poor, trade reform can be designed to mitigate these effects. This includes making reforms as broad based as possible, sequencing and phasing them to allow for adjustment, and implementing social safety nets and other reforms that facilitate adjustment to the new trade policy. In assessing these findings, it should be borne in mind that the links between trade reform and poverty are complex, making systematic empirical investigations difficult.

Suggested Citation

  • Geoffrey J Bannister, 2001. "International Trade and Poverty Alleviation," IMF Working Papers 01/54, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/54
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    Cited by:

    1. Oetzel, Jennifer M. & Banerjee, Sudeshna Ghosh, 2008. "A case of the tortoise versus the hare? Deregulation process, timing, and firm performance in emerging markets," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 54-77, February.
    2. Jenkins, Rhys, 2005. "Globalization, Production and Poverty," WIDER Working Paper Series 040, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Reimer, Jeffrey J., 2002. "Estimating the poverty impacts of trade liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2790, The World Bank.
    4. Rhys Jenkins, 2004. "Globalization, production, employment and poverty: debates and evidence," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 1-12.
    5. Ole BOYSEN & Alan MATTHEWS, "undated". "Poverty Impacts of an Economic Partnership Agreement between Uganda and the EU," EcoMod2008 23800016, EcoMod.
    6. San Vicente Portes, Luis, 2009. "On the distributional effects of trade policy: Dynamics of household saving and asset prices," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 944-970, August.
    7. Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S. & Selvanathan, Saroja, 2011. "Trade and poverty nexus: A case study of Sri Lanka," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 328-346, March.
    8. Kaliappa Kalirajan & VenkatachalamAnbumozhi & Kanhaiya Singh, 2010. "Measuring the Environmental Impacts of Changing Trade Patterns on the Poor," Trade Working Papers 22727, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    9. Grabiella Berloffa & Maria Luigia Segnana, 2004. "Trade, inequality and pro-poor growth: Two perspectives, one message?," Department of Economics Working Papers 0408, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    10. Guillaume Daudin, 2003. "Tous unis contre le protectionnisme des pays du Nord ?," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 84(1), pages 95-130.
    11. Narayanan, Sudha & Gulati, Ashok, 2002. "Globalization and the smallholders," MSSD discussion papers 50, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Sami Bibi & Rim Chatti, 2006. "Trade Liberalization and the Dynamics of Poverty in Tunisia: a Layered CGE Microsimulation Analysis/Libéralisation des échanges et dynamique de la pauvreté en Tunisie: Analyse avec une micro-simulatio," Working Papers MPIA 2006-07, PEP-MPIA.
    13. FE, Doukouré Charles, 2010. "Réduction de Droits de Douane et Convergence Réelle dans l'UEMOA
      [Tariffs Reduction and Real Convergence in WAEMU]
      ," MPRA Paper 26763, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Ole Boysen & Alan Matthews, 2009. "The Economic Partnership Agreement between Uganda and the EU: Trade and Poverty Impacts," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp307, IIIS.
    15. Nicolas Hérault, 2004. "Un modèle d'équilibre général calculable (MEGC) pour évaluer les effets de l'ouverture au commerce international : le cas de l'Afrique du Sud," Documents de travail 102, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    16. Nunnenkamp, Peter & Thiele, Rainer, 2004. "Strategien zur Bekämpfung der weltweiten Armut: Irrwege, Umwege und Auswege," Kiel Discussion Papers 407, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    17. Luis San Vicente Portes, 2005. "On the Distributional Effects of Trade Policy: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 358, Society for Computational Economics.
    18. repec:asi:adprev:2017:p:226-242 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Auboin, Marc, 2004. "The trade, debt and finance nexus: at the cross-roads of micro- and macroeconomics," WTO Discussion Papers 6, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    20. Thomas W. Hertel & Jeffrey J. Reimer, 2006. "Predicting the Poverty Impacts of Trade Reform," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 2, May.
    21. Caroline M Kende-Robb, 2003. "Poverty and Social Impact Analysis; Linking Macroeconomic Policies to Poverty Outcomes: Summary of Early Experiences," IMF Working Papers 03/43, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International trade; Poverty alleviation; Trade liberalization; trade reform; effects of trade liberalization; trade reforms; Welfare and Poverty: General;

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