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China's Provincial Growth Dynamics

  • Jahangir Aziz
  • Christoph Duenwald
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    China's rapid overall growth since 1978 masks significant differences in relative economic performance across its provinces. This paper finds that, while per capita income of poor provinces are catching up with those in the rich, the relative income distribution appears to be stratifying into a bimodal distribution--the costal provinces grativating toward one mode, and the remaining provinces toward the other--with economic structure and policies playing important roles in the growth dynamics.

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    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 01/3.

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    Length: 22
    Date of creation: 01 Jan 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/3
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    1. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1990. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Steven N. Durlauf & Danny T. Quah, 1998. "The New Empirics of Economic Growth," Working Papers 98-01-012, Santa Fe Institute.
    3. Quah, Danny, 1993. " Galton's Fallacy and Tests of the Convergence Hypothesis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(4), pages 427-43, December.
    4. Paul Cashin & Ratna Sahay, 1996. "Internal Migration, Center-State Grants, and Economic Growth in the States of India," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 123-171, March.
    5. Tianlun Jian & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1996. "Trends in Regional Inequality in China," NBER Working Papers 5412, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Hong Li & Zinan Liu & Ivonia Rebelo, 1998. "Testing the Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth: Evidence from Chinese Provinces," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 117-132, May.
    7. Chen, Jian & Fleisher, Belton M., 1996. "Regional Income Inequality and Economic Growth in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 141-164, April.
    8. Baumol, William J & Wolff, Edward N, 1988. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1155-59, December.
    9. Anuradha Dayal-Gulati & Aasim M. Husain, 2000. "Centripetal forces in China's Economic Take-Off," IMF Working Papers 00/86, International Monetary Fund.
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