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Stock Market Liberalizations; Financial and Macroeconomic Implications


  • Norbert Funke
  • Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln


Using a panel of 27 countries, we analyze the effects of stock market liberalization on financial and macroeconomic development. We find that liberalization is associated with a short-term increase in real private investment growth of about 14 percentage points cumulatively in the four years following liberalization and a cumulative 4 percentage point increase in real GDP per capita growth. Growth tends to be higher if institutional reforms precede liberalization. In contrast to other studies, we also find evidence for a permanent growth effect of about 0.4 percent a year in an extended sample of 72 countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Norbert Funke & Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln, 2001. "Stock Market Liberalizations; Financial and Macroeconomic Implications," IMF Working Papers 01/193, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/193

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Grais, Wafik & Kantur, Zeynep, 2003. "The changing financial landscape : opportunities and challenges for the Middle East and North Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3050, The World Bank.
    2. Saleh M. Nsouli & Norbert Funke, 2003. "The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) Opportunities and Challenges," IMF Working Papers 03/69, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Biaggio Bossone & Sandeep Mahajan & Farah Zahir, 2003. "Financial Infrastructure, Group Interests, and Capital Accumulation; Theory, Evidence, and Policy," IMF Working Papers 03/24, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Michael Frenkel & Lukas Menkhoff, 2004. "Are Foreign Institutional Investors Good for Emerging Markets?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(8), pages 1275-1293, August.
    5. Eva de Francisco, 2005. "Limited Participation, Income Distribution and Capital Account Liberalization," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 454, Society for Computational Economics.
    6. Norbert Funke, 2002. "Stock Market Developments and Private Consumer Spending in Emerging Markets," IMF Working Papers 02/238, International Monetary Fund.
    7. repec:eee:intfin:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:182-203 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Ben Naceur, Samy & Ghazouani, Samir & Omran, Mohammed, 2008. "Does stock market liberalization spur financial and economic development in the MENA region?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 673-693, December.


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