IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The New International Financial Architecture and Africa

  • Saleh M. Nsouli
  • Françoise Le Gall
Registered author(s):

    The new international financial architecture can help African countries benefit from globalization, while minimizing the risks, and foster an environment conducive to increased domestic investment and higher sustained growth. This paper highlights the progress that African countries have made in several areas of the new architecture, but it also underscores the considerable way that these countries must go to meet the requirements of the new architecture.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=15322
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 01/130.

    as
    in new window

    Length: 33
    Date of creation: 01 Sep 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/130
    Contact details of provider: Postal: International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC USA
    Phone: (202) 623-7000
    Fax: (202) 623-4661
    Web page: http://www.imf.org/external/pubind.htm
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/pubs/ord_info.htm

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Paolo Mauro, 1996. "The Effects of Corruptionon Growth, Investment, and Government Expenditure," IMF Working Papers 96/98, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Jean-Pierre Briffaut & George Iden & Peter C. Hayward & Tonny Lybek & Hassanali Mehran & Piero Ugolini & Stephen Swaray, 1998. "Financial Sector Development in Sub-Saharan African Countries," IMF Occasional Papers 169, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Vito Tanzi & Hamid Reza Davoodi, 1997. "Corruption, Public Investment, and Growth," IMF Working Papers 97/139, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Ceyla Pazarbasioglu & Claudia Helene Dziobek, 1997. "Lessons From Systemic Bank Restructuring; A Survey of 24 Countries," IMF Working Papers 97/161, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Stanley Fischer, 2001. "Exchange Rate Regimes: Is the Bipolar View Correct?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 3-24, Spring.
    6. Morris Goldstein, 1998. "The Asian Financial Crisis," Policy Briefs PB98-1, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    7. Dhaneshwar Ghura & Anupam Basu & Evangelos A. Calamitsis, 1999. "Adjustment and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 99/51, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
    9. Joachim Harnack & Sérgio Pereira. Leite & Stefania Fabrizio & L. Zanforlin & Girma Begashaw & Anthony J. Pellechio, 2000. "Ghana: Economic Development in a Democratic Environment," IMF Occasional Papers 199, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/130. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow)

    or (Hassan Zaidi)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.