IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/imf/imfwpa/01-130.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The New International Financial Architecture and Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Saleh M. Nsouli
  • Françoise Le Gall

Abstract

The new international financial architecture can help African countries benefit from globalization, while minimizing the risks, and foster an environment conducive to increased domestic investment and higher sustained growth. This paper highlights the progress that African countries have made in several areas of the new architecture, but it also underscores the considerable way that these countries must go to meet the requirements of the new architecture.

Suggested Citation

  • Saleh M. Nsouli & Françoise Le Gall, 2001. "The New International Financial Architecture and Africa," IMF Working Papers 01/130, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/130
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.aspx?sk=15322
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Morris Goldstein, 1998. "The Asian Financial Crisis," Policy Briefs PB98-1, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    2. Dhaneshwar Ghura & Anupam Basu & Anthony E Calamitsis, 1999. "Adjustment and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 99/51, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Vito Tanzi & Hamid R Davoodi, 1997. "Corruption, Public Investment, and Growth," IMF Working Papers 97/139, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Joachim Harnack & Sérgio Pereira. Leite & Stefania Fabrizio & Luisa Zanforlin & Girma Begashaw & Anthony J. Pellechio, 2000. "Ghana; Economic Development in a Democratic Environment," IMF Occasional Papers 199, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Paolo Mauro, 1996. "The Effects of Corruptionon Growth, Investment, and Government Expenditure," IMF Working Papers 96/98, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Ceyla Pazarbasioglu & Claudia H Dziobek, 1997. "Lessons From Systemic Bank Restructuring; A Survey of 24 Countries," IMF Working Papers 97/161, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
    8. Stanley Fischer, 2001. "Exchange Rate Regimes: Is the Bipolar View Correct?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 3-24, Spring.
    9. Mounir Rached & Saleh M. Nsouli, 1998. "Capital Account Liberalization in the Southern Mediterranean Region," IMF Policy Discussion Papers 98/11, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Jean-Pierre Briffaut & George Iden & Peter C. Hayward & Tonny Lybek & Hassanali Mehran & Piero Ugolini & Stephen M Swaray, 1998. "Financial Sector Development in Sub-Saharan African Countries," IMF Occasional Papers 169, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; International financial system; Globalization; international financial architecture; international financial; financial system; International Economic Order;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/130. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jim Beardow) or (Hassan Zaidi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/imfffus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.