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Determinants of Inflation in the Islamic Republic of Iran; A Macroeconomic Analysis


  • O. Liu
  • Olumuyiwa S Adedeji


This study establishes a framework for analyzing the major determinants of inflation in the Islamic Republic of Iran. An empirical model was estimated by taking into consideration disequilibria in the markets for money, foreign exchange, and goods. Results strongly support the need for a sustained prudent monetary policy in order to reduce inflation and stabilize the foreign exchange market. The estimation shows that an excess money supply generates an increase in the rate of inflation that, in turn, intensifies asset substitution (from money to foreign exchange), thereby weakening real demand for money and exerting pressures on the foreign exchange market. The study also found that a permanent rise in real income tends to increase the real demand for money and reduces inflation in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • O. Liu & Olumuyiwa S Adedeji, 2000. "Determinants of Inflation in the Islamic Republic of Iran; A Macroeconomic Analysis," IMF Working Papers 00/127, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:00/127

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Esfahani, Hadi Salehi & Mohaddes, Kamiar & Pesaran, M. Hashem, 2013. "Oil exports and the Iranian economy," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 221-237.
    2. Marek Dabrowski & Wojciech Paczynski & Lukasz Rawdanowicz, 2002. "Inflation and Monetary Policy in Russia: Transition Experience and Future Recommendations," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0241, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    3. I, Sahadudheen, 2012. "A cointegration and error correction approach to the determinants of inflation in India," MPRA Paper 65561, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    4. Mangal Goswami & Oya Celasun, 2002. "An Analysis of Money Demand and Inflation in the Islamic Republic of Iran," IMF Working Papers 02/205, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Hasanov, Fakhri, 2009. "Analyzing price level in a booming economy: the case of Azerbaijan," MPRA Paper 29555, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Pelipas, Igor, 2006. "Money demand and inflation in Belarus: Evidence from cointegrated VAR," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 200-214, June.
    7. Magda Kandil & Hanan Morsy, 2011. "Determinants Of Inflation In Gcc," Middle East Development Journal (MEDJ), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(02), pages 141-158.
    8. Jalil, Abdul & Tariq, Rabbia & Bibi, Nazia, 2014. "Fiscal deficit and inflation: New evidences from Pakistan using a bounds testing approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 120-126.


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