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Budgetary Convergence in the WEAMU; Adjustment Through Revenue or Expenditure?

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  • Jean-Claude Nachega
  • Ousmane Dore

Abstract

A regional convergence pact adopted recently by the Conference of Heads of States of WAEMU provides a framework for fiscal convergence similar to the European Union’s Maastricht Treaty. Using bivariate co-integration and error-correction models, this paper investigates the relationship between revenue and expenditure in seven member countries to determine the feasibility and nature of the policy adjustment required to meet the new convergence criteria. The results indicate that, in the long run, there is causality running from revenue to expenditure in Burkina Faso and Senegal, from expenditure to revenue in Benin and Togo, a bidirectional causality in Côte d’Ivoire and Mali, and no causality in Niger.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Claude Nachega & Ousmane Dore, 2000. "Budgetary Convergence in the WEAMU; Adjustment Through Revenue or Expenditure?," IMF Working Papers 00/109, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:00/109
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henning Bohn, "undated". "Budget Balance Through Revenue or Spending Adjustments ? Some Historical Evidence for the United States (Reprint 013)," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 03-91, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
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    6. Fischer, Andreas M., 1989. "Policy regime changes and monetary expectations : Testing for super exogeneity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 423-436, November.
    7. Gerard Antioch, 1998. "Fiscal policy dynamics in Australia and New Zealand," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(9), pages 539-541.
    8. Ram, Rati, 1988. "A Multicountry Perspective on Causality between Government Revenue and Government Expenditure," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 43(2), pages 261-270.
    9. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
    10. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
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    12. Jones, Jonathan D. & Joulfaian, David, 1991. "Federal govemment expenditures and revenues in the early years of the American republic: Evidence from 1792 to 1860," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 133-155.
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    Cited by:

    1. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2010. "Public expenditure and revenue in Italy, 1862-1993," MPRA Paper 27308, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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