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The Economics of Bank Restructuring; Understanding the Options


  • Augustin Landier
  • Kenichi Ueda


Based on a simple framework, this note clarifies the economics behind bank restructuring and evaluates various restructuring options for systemically important banks. The note assumes that the government aims to reduce the probability of a bank’s default and keep the burden on taxpayers at a minimum. The note also acknowledges that the design of any restructuring needs to take into consideration the payoffs and incentives for the various key stakeholders (i.e., shareholders, debt holders, and government).

Suggested Citation

  • Augustin Landier & Kenichi Ueda, 2009. "The Economics of Bank Restructuring; Understanding the Options," IMF Staff Position Notes 2009/12, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfspn:2009/12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard H. Clarida, 2007. "G7 Current Account Imbalances: Sustainability and Adjustment," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number clar06-2, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sudipto Bhattacharya & Kjell G. Nyborg, 2013. "Bank Bailout Menus," Review of Corporate Finance Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 29-61.
    2. Marc Quintyn, 2009. "Methods for Restructuring Banks," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 7(3), pages 3-8, October.
    3. Paul Glasserman & Zhenyu Wang, 2011. "Valuing the Treasury's Capital Assistance Program," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 57(7), pages 1195-1211, July.
    4. Thomas Philippon & Philipp Schnabl, 2013. "Efficient Recapitalization," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(1), pages 1-42, February.
    5. repec:eee:jfinin:v:32:y:2017:i:c:p:16-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Koziol, Christian & Lawrenz, Jochen, 2012. "Contingent convertibles. Solving or seeding the next banking crisis?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 90-104.
    7. Hryckiewicz, Aneta, 2014. "What do we know about the impact of government interventions in the banking sector? An assessment of various bailout programs on bank behavior," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 246-265.
    8. Jimmy Melo, 2014. "Expectativas cambiarias, selección adversa y liquidez," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(1), pages 27-62, May.
    9. Phillip Swagel, 2009. "The Financial Crisis: An Inside View," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 40(1 (Spring), pages 1-78.


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