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Euro Area Policies; Selected Issues

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  • International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This Selected Issues paper assesses the youth unemployment problem in advanced European economies, especially the euro area. Youth unemployment rates increased sharply in the euro area after the crisis. Much of these increases can be explained by output dynamics and the greater sensitivity of youth unemployment to economic activity compared with adult unemployment. Labor market institutions also play an important role, especially the tax wedge, minimum wages, and spending on active labor market policies. The paper highlights that policies to address youth unemployment should be comprehensive and country specific, focusing on reviving growth and implementing structural reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 2014. "Euro Area Policies; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 14/199, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfscr:14/199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Jacopo Cimadomo, 2005. "Has the Stability and Growth Pact Made Fiscal Policy More Pro-Cyclical?," La Lettre du CEPII, CEPII research center, issue 247.
    9. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "Estimating Potential Output with a Multivariate Filter," IMF Working Papers 10/285, International Monetary Fund.
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    Keywords

    Capital markets; Current account; Euro Area; Selected Issues Papers; Public debt; Fiscal reforms; Fiscal policy; Labor markets; Investment; Unemployment; youth unemployment; labor market; employment;

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