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Cambodia; Ex Post Assessment of Longer-Term Program Engagement


  • International Monetary Fund


This Ex Post Assessment of Longer-Term Program Engagement for Cambodia reports its progress in implementing its economic stabilization, reconstruction, and reform programs. Prior to the normalization of relations with the IMF, Cambodia faced waves of rapid inflation and exchange rate depreciation, reflecting the government’s recurrent resort to money creation to finance the fiscal deficit as external assistance withered. With monetary instability and negative real interest rates, financial intermediation levels and confidence remain low.

Suggested Citation

  • International Monetary Fund, 2004. "Cambodia; Ex Post Assessment of Longer-Term Program Engagement," IMF Staff Country Reports 04/324, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfscr:04/324

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Khalifa Ghali, 1999. "Government size and economic growth: evidence from a multivariate cointegration analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(8), pages 975-987.
    2. Marcello M. Estevão & Evridiki Tsounta, 2011. "Has the Great Recession Raised U.S. Structural Unemployment?," IMF Working Papers 11/105, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Ranis, Gustav, 1989. "The role of institutions in transition growth: The East Asian newly industrializing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(9), pages 1443-1453, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Sokchea, 2006. "An Analysis of Cambodia’s Trade Flows: A Gravity Model," MPRA Paper 21461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sjöholm, Fredrik & Sjöberg, Örjan, 2005. "The Cambodian Economy: Ready For Take-Off?," EIJS Working Paper Series 209, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.


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