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Africa in the Doha Round; Dealing with Preference Erosion and Beyond

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  • Yongzheng Yang

Abstract

Improving market access in industrial countries and retaining preferences have been Africa's two key objectives in the Doha Round trade negotiations. This paper argues that African negotiators may have overlooked the potential market access gains in developing countries, where trade barriers remain relatively high and demand for African imports has expanded substantially over the past decades. As reductions in most-favored-nation tariffs in industrial countries will inevitably lead to preference erosion, African countries need to ensure that the Doha Round leads to liberalization in all sectors by all World Trade Organization (WTO) members, so that the resulting gains will offset any losses. Such an outcome is more likely if African countries also offer to liberalize their own trade regimes and focus on reciprocal liberalization as a negotiation strategy rather on preferential and differential treatment.

Suggested Citation

  • Yongzheng Yang, 2005. "Africa in the Doha Round; Dealing with Preference Erosion and Beyond," IMF Policy Discussion Papers 05/8, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfpdp:05/8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wusheng Yu & Trine Vig Jensen, 2005. "Tariff Preferences, WTO Negotiations and the LDCs: The Case of the 'Everything But Arms' Initiative," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 375-405, March.
    2. Yongzheng Yang & Sanjeev Gupta, 2005. "Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa; Past Performance and the Way Forward," IMF Working Papers 05/36, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Hans P Lankes & Katerina Alexandraki, 2004. "The Impact of Preference Erosionon Middle-Income Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 04/169, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Kym Anderson & Will Martin & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 2006. "Would Multilateral Trade Reform Benefit Sub-Saharan Africans?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(4), pages 626-670, December.
    5. William R. Cline, 2004. "Trade Policy and Global Poverty," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 379.
    6. Marcelo Olarreaga & Çaglar Özden, 2005. "AGOA and Apparel: Who Captures the Tariff Rent in the Presence of Preferential Market Access?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 63-77, January.
    7. Przemyslaw Kowalski, 2005. "Impact of Changes in Tariffs on Developing Countries' Government Revenue," OECD Trade Policy Papers 18, OECD Publishing.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Willenbockel, Dirk, 2009. "From overhang to hangover: consequences of protectionist responses to the global crisis for low-income countries," MPRA Paper 16100, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mary Amiti & John Romalis, 2007. "Will the Doha Round Lead to Preference Erosion?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 54(2), pages 338-384, June.
    3. Hans Weisfeld & Manuela Goretti, 2008. "Trade in the WAEMU; Developments and Reform Opportunities," IMF Working Papers 08/68, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Anania, Giovanni, 2010. "EU Economic Partnership Agreements and WTO negotiations. A quantitative assessment of trade preference granting and erosion in the banana market," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 140-153, April.
    5. Anania, Giovanni, 2008. "Economic Partnership Agreements and WTO negotiations. A quantitative assessment of trade preference granting and erosion in the banana market," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 44215, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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