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Moving to Greater Exchange Rate Flexibility; Operational Aspects Based on Lessons from Detailed Country Experiences

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Abstract

Many countries have moved towards more flexible exchange rate regimes over the last decade to take advantage of greater monetary policy autonomy and flexibility in responding to external shocks. Some reluctance to let go of pegged exchange rates persists, however, despite the benefits of flexibility. The institutional and operational requirements needed to support a floating exchange rate, as well as difficulties in assessing the right time and manner to exit, tend to be additional factors in this reluctance. This volume presents the concrete steps taken by a number of countries in transition to greater exchange rate flexibility and elaborates on the operational ingredients that proved helpful in promoting successful and durable transitions. It attempts to provide a better understanding (and hence a "road map") of how these various operational ingredients were established and coordinated, how their implementation interacted with macro and other conditions, and how they contributed to the smoothness of each transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Inci Ötker, 2007. "Moving to Greater Exchange Rate Flexibility; Operational Aspects Based on Lessons from Detailed Country Experiences," IMF Occasional Papers 256, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:256
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    Cited by:

    1. S. Rajan, Ramkishen, 2010. "The Evolution and Impact of Asian Exchange Rate Regimes," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 208, Asian Development Bank.
    2. Inci Ötker & Charles Freedman, 2009. "Country Experiences with the Introduction and Implementation of Inflation Targeting," IMF Working Papers 09/161, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Qiang Gong & Shen Jia & Justin Yifu Lin, 2009. "Firm Liquidation and Economic Crisis under Unexpected Exchange Rate Shock," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 1-14, May.
    4. Carvalho, Fabia A. & Minella, André, 2012. "Survey forecasts in Brazil: A prismatic assessment of epidemiology, performance, and determinants," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1371-1391.
    5. International Monetary Fund, 2010. "Republic of Kazakhstan; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 10/237, International Monetary Fund.
    6. David Vávra & Inci Ötker & Barry Topf & Zbigniew Polanski, 2007. "Coping with Capital Inflows; Experiences of Selected European Countries," IMF Working Papers 07/190, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Nasha Ananchotikul & Nuwat Nookhwun & Paiboon Pongpaichet & Songklod Rastapana & Phurichai Rungcharoenkitkul, 2010. "The Future of Monetary Policy: Roles of Financial Stability and Exchange Rate," Working Papers 2010-07, Monetary Policy Group, Bank of Thailand.
    8. Brause, Alexander, 2008. "Foreign exchange interventions in emerging market countries: New lessons from Argentina," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 79, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Floating exchange rates; exchange rate; inflation; monetary policy; central bank; exchange rate flexibility;

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