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Monetary Union Among Member Countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council

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Listed:
  • Ugo Fasano-Filho
  • Andrea Schaechter

Abstract

The six member countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--have made important progress toward economic and financial integration, with the aim of establishing an economic and monetary union. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the economic performance and policies of the GCC countries during 1990-2002. Drawing on the lessons from the experience of selected currency and monetary unions in Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean, it assesses the potential costs and benefits of a common currency for GCC countries and also reviews the options for implementing a monetary union among these countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Ugo Fasano-Filho & Andrea Schaechter, 2003. "Monetary Union Among Member Countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council," IMF Occasional Papers 223, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:223
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    Cited by:

    1. Ricci, Luca Antonio, 2008. "A Model of an Optimum Currency Area," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 2, pages 1-31.
    2. manhal shotar & khalid shams, 2005. "Economic Policies and the Possibilities of Unified GCC Currency," Macroeconomics 0506003, EconWPA.
    3. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chang, Chun-Ping & Chen, Pei-Fen, 2008. "Money demand function versus monetary integration: Revisiting panel cointegration among GCC countries," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 85-93.
    4. Meissner, Christopher M. & Oomes, Nienke, 2009. "Why do countries peg the way they peg? The determinants of anchor currency choice," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 522-547, April.
    5. Louis, Rosmy & Osman, Mohammad & Balli, FAruk, 2007. "On The Road to Monetary Union – Do Arab Gulf Cooperation Council Economies React in the same way to United States' Monetary Policy Shocks?," MPRA Paper 11610, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2008.
    6. Saade Chami & Selim Elekdag & Ivan Tchakarov, 2007. "What are the Potential Economic Benefits of Enlarging the Gulf Cooperation Council?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 521-548.
    7. Jian-Ye Wang & Nisreen H. Farhan & Amar Shanghavi & Márcio Valério Ronci & Misa Takebe, 2008. "The Choice of Monetary and Exchange Rate Arrangements for a Small, Open, Low-Income Economy; The Case of São Tomé and Príncipe," IMF Working Papers 08/118, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Louis, Rosmy & Balli, Faruk & Osman, Mohammad, 2008. "Monetary Union Among Arab Gulf Cooperation Council (AGCC) Countries: Does the symmetry of shocks extend to the non-oil sector?," MPRA Paper 11611, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn & Suleiman Abu-Bader, 2008. "On the Optimality of a GCC Monetary Union: Structural VAR, Common Trends, and Common Cycles Evidence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(5), pages 612-630, May.
    10. Abdulrazak Al Faris, 2010. "Currency Union in the GCC Countries: History, Prerequisites and Implications," Chapters,in: Currency Union and Exchange Rate Issues, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Rafiq, M.S., 2011. "The optimality of a gulf currency union: Commonalities and idiosyncrasies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 728-740, January.
    12. Ashraf Nakibullah, 2011. "Monetary Policy and Performance of the Oil-Exporting Gulf Cooperation Council Countries," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 10(2), pages 139-157, August.
    13. Emilie Rutledge, 2008. "Is EMU a viable model for monetary integration in the Arabian Gulf?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 123-134.
    14. Hinnerk Gnutzmann & Arevik Gnutzmann-Mkrtchyan, 2016. "The Silent Success of Customs Unions," CESifo Working Paper Series 5944, CESifo Group Munich.
    15. Hebous, Shafik, 2006. "On the monetary union of the Gulf States," Kiel Advanced Studies Working Papers 431, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    16. Willem H. Buiter, 2010. "Economic, Political and Institutional Prerequisites for Monetary Union Among the Members of the Gulf Cooperation Council," Chapters,in: Currency Union and Exchange Rate Issues, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Rafiq, M.S., 2011. "The optimality of a gulf currency union: Commonalities and idiosyncrasies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 728-740.

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