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Social Issues in IMF-Supported Programs

Author

Listed:
  • Ritha S. Khemani
  • Sanjeev Gupta
  • Calvin A McDonald
  • Louis Dicks-Mireaux
  • Marijn Verhoeven

Abstract

As part of its mandate, the IMF seeks to create the conditions necessary for sustained high-quality growth, which encompasses a broad range of elements. These include sound macroeconomic policies, growth-enhancing structural reforms, good governance, and such social policies as cost-effective social safety nets and targeted social expenditures. This paper reviews the IMF's policy advice in two key areas of social policy: social safety nets and public spending on education and health care. It was initiated as part of the work by the World Bank and IMF to strengthen the poverty focus of adjustment programs in low-income countries, in particular within the framework of the Initiative for Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPCs).

Suggested Citation

  • Ritha S. Khemani & Sanjeev Gupta & Calvin A McDonald & Louis Dicks-Mireaux & Marijn Verhoeven, 2000. "Social Issues in IMF-Supported Programs," IMF Occasional Papers 191, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:191
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ricardo Martin & Alex Segura-Ubiergo, 2005. "Fiscal Discipline and Social Spending in IMF-supported Programs," Public Economics 0504012, EconWPA.
    2. Paulo Silva Lopes, 2002. "A Comparative Analysis of Government Social Spending Indicators and Their Correlation with Social Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 02/176, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Stubbs, Thomas & Kentikelenis, Alexander & Stuckler, David & McKee, Martin & King, Lawrence, 2017. "The impact of IMF conditionality on government health expenditure: A cross-national analysis of 16 West African nations," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 220-227.
    4. Lora, Eduardo & Olivera, Mauricio, 2007. "Public debt and social expenditure: Friends or foes?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 299-310, December.
    5. repec:eee:socmed:v:187:y:2017:i:c:p:296-305 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Emanuele Baldacci & Maria Teresa Guin-Siu & Luiz De Mello, 2003. "More on the effectiveness of public spending on health care and education: a covariance structure model," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(6), pages 709-725.
    7. Vassili Prokopenko & Paul Holden, 2001. "Financial Development and Poverty Alleviation; Issues and Policy Implications for Developing and Transition Countries," IMF Working Papers 01/160, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Alfredo Cuevas, 2001. "Short- and Long-Term Poverty and Social Policy in a “Snakes and Ladders” Model of Growth," IMF Working Papers 01/172, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Kentikelenis, Alexander E. & Stubbs, Thomas H. & King, Lawrence P., 2015. "Structural adjustment and public spending on health: Evidence from IMF programs in low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 169-176.
    10. Nicolas Van de Sijpe, 2013. "Is Foreign Aid Fungible? Evidence from the Education and Health Sectors," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(2), pages 320-356.

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