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Back to the Future; Postwar Reconstruction and Stabilization in Lebanon


  • Thomas Helbling
  • Sena Eken


Following the 15-year civil war that started in 1975, Lebanon's government began the difficult task of economic stabilization and confidence building, on the one hand, and postwar reconstruction and development, on the other. The government led the reconstruction effort by formulating programs that aimed to rapidly rehabilitate the country's severly damaged infrastructure in preparation for private-sector-led growth over the medium term. At the same time, Lebanon introduced an exchange-rate-based nominal anchor policy to stabilize expectations and cut inflation. This paper analyzes the government's progress with the policies adopted.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Helbling & Sena Eken, 1999. "Back to the Future; Postwar Reconstruction and Stabilization in Lebanon," IMF Occasional Papers 176, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:176

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    Cited by:

    1. Harvie, Charles & Pahlavani, Mosayeb & Saleh, Ali Salman, 2006. "Identifying Structural Breaks in the Lebanese Economy 1970-2003: An Application of the Zivot and Andrews Test," Economics Working Papers wp06-02, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    2. Axel Schimmelpfennig & E. H. Gardner, 2008. "Lebanon—Weathering the Perfect Storms," IMF Working Papers 08/17, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Samer Saab, 2005. "Is Lebanon’s Debt Sustainable? A Closer Look at Lebanon’s Debt Dynamics," Public Economics 0505006, EconWPA.
    4. Harvie, Charles & Saleh, Ali Salman, 2007. "Lebanon’s Fiscal Crisis and Economic Reconstruction after War: the case of a bridge too far?," Economics Working Papers wp07-04, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

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