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India; Economic Reform and Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Hemming
  • Woosik Chu
  • Charles Collyns
  • Karen Elizabeth Parker
  • Ajai Chopra
  • Oliver Fratzscher

Abstract

This paper explores the Indian adjustment program of 1991/92 and its initial results. The contents include long-term growth trends for output, investment, and macroeconomic condition; education, labor employment, and poverty; growth, accumulation, and productivity; results of India-specific studies; the stabilization and adjustment strategy; the response to the reforms; the impact on unemployment and poverty; the behavior of private investment; fiscal adjustment and reform; recent experience with a surge in capital inflows: overall trends, the investor base, comparison with other countries, and factors behind the flows; the impact on the economy; the sustainability of capital flows; and structural reforms and the implications for investment and growth; trade reform; the investment regime; public enterprise reform; and financial market reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Hemming & Woosik Chu & Charles Collyns & Karen Elizabeth Parker & Ajai Chopra & Oliver Fratzscher, 1995. "India; Economic Reform and Growth," IMF Occasional Papers 134, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:134
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    Cited by:

    1. Eric V. Edmonds & Nina Pavcnik & Petia Topalova, 2010. "Trade Adjustment and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Indian Tariff Reform," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 42-75, October.
    2. Pinto, Brian & Zahir, Farah, 2004. "India : why fiscal adjustment now," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3230, The World Bank.
    3. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian, 2005. "From "Hindu Growth" to Productivity Surge: The Mystery of the Indian Growth Transition," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(2), pages 193-228, September.
    4. Cashin, P. & Olekalns, N., 2000. "An Examination of the Sustainability of Indian Fiscal Policy," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 748, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Ferrero, Mario, 2001. "Political exchange in mass party regimes and the transition from socialism," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 365-379, December.
    6. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Amit Kumar Khandelwal & Nina Pavcnik & Petia Topalova, 2010. "Imported Intermediate Inputs and Domestic Product Growth: Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1727-1767.
    7. Ghosh, Saibal, 2009. "Do productivity and ownership really matter for growth? Firm-level evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1403-1413, November.
    8. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Hu, Linlin & Liu, Yuanli & Mahal, Ajay & Yip, Winnie, 2010. "The contribution of population health and demographic change to economic growth in China and India," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 17-33, March.
    9. Alejandro Nin-Pratt & Bingxin Yu & Shenggen Fan, 2010. "Comparisons of agricultural productivity growth in China and India," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 209-223, June.
    10. Gouri, Geeta, 1997. "The new economic policy and privatization in India," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 455-479.
    11. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611.
    12. Petia Topalova, 2004. "Overview of the Indian Corporate Sector; 1989-2002," IMF Working Papers 04/64, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Naastepad, C. W. M., 2002. "Trade-offs in stabilisation: a real-financial CGE analysis with reference to India," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 221-244, March.

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