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Economic Reform in China; A New Phase

Author

Listed:
  • David Burton
  • Wanda S Tseng
  • Kalpana Kochhar
  • Hoe Ee Khor
  • Dubravko Mihaljek

Abstract

China's economic performance hs been remarkable since the the reform process began 15 years ago. Notwithstanding the achievements that have been made, a number of serious problems remain. This papers discusses the current reform program and the effors being made to overcome the structural impediments to growth.

Suggested Citation

  • David Burton & Wanda S Tseng & Kalpana Kochhar & Hoe Ee Khor & Dubravko Mihaljek, 1994. "Economic Reform in China; A New Phase," IMF Occasional Papers 114, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfocp:114
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    Cited by:

    1. Laura Komlóssy & Gyöngyi Körmendi & Sándor Ladányi, 2017. "The Road to a Market-Oriented Monetary Policy and the “New Normal” Monetary Policy Regime in China," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 16(Sepcial I), pages 101-125.
    2. Tyers, Rod, 2015. "International effects of China's rise and transition: Neoclassical and Keynesian perspectives," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-19.
    3. Andrew Feltenstein & Saleh M. Nsouli, 2003. ""Big Bang" Versus Gradualism in Economic Reforms: An Intertemporal Analysis with an Application to China," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(3), pages 1-6.
    4. Dubravko Mihaljek & Bruno Tissot, 2003. "Fiscal positions in emerging econimies: central banks' perspective," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Fiscal issues and central banking in emerging economies, volume 20, pages 10-37 Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2009. "Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12777.
    6. Geneviève BOYREAU-DEBRAY, 1998. "Money Demand and the Potential of Seigniorage in China," Working Papers 199821, CERDI.
    7. Rod Tyers, 2016. "China and Global Macroeconomic Interdependence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(11), pages 1674-1702, November.
    8. Pomfret, Richard, 1997. "Growth and Transition: Why Has China's Performance Been So Different?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 422-440, December.
    9. Aaron Mehrotra, 2008. "Demand for Money in Transition: Evidence from China’s Disinflation," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 14(1), pages 36-47, February.
    10. Harvie, C., 1998. "Economic Transition: What Can Be Learned from China's Experience?," Economics Working Papers wp98-04, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    11. Fernald, John & Edison, Hali & Loungani, Prakash, 1999. "Was China the first domino? Assessing links between China and other Asian economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 515-535, August.
    12. Phylaktis, Kate & Girardin, Eric, 2001. "Foreign exchange markets in transition economies: China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 215-235, February.
    13. Clark, Ephraim, 1998. "Political Risk in Hong Kong and Taiwan: Pricing the China Factor," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 13, pages 276-291.
    14. Cerra, Valerie & Saxena, Sweta Chaman, 2003. "How responsive is Chinese export supply to market signals?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 350-370.
    15. David Chu & Kolleen Rask, 2000. "The Transformation of China’s Health Care System and Accounting Methods: Current Reforms and Developments," Working Papers 0003, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    16. Massimo Caruso, 2002. "Procyclical Productivity and Output Growth in China: An Econometric Analysis," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 251-274, July.
    17. repec:kap:iaecre:v:14:y:2008:i:1:p:36-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Lin, Guijun & Schramm, Ronald M., 2003. "China's foreign exchange policies since 1979: A review of developments and an assessment," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 246-280.
    19. Feltenstein, Andrew & Iwata, Shigeru, 2005. "Decentralization and macroeconomic performance in China: regional autonomy has its costs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 481-501, April.
    20. Ying Wu, 2010. "Exchange Rates and Prices under Processing Trade: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(3), pages 345-357, September.
    21. John Brondolo & Zhiyong Zhang, 2016. "Tax Administration Reform in China; Achievements, Challenges, and Reform Priorities," IMF Working Papers 16/68, International Monetary Fund.
    22. Sweta Chaman Saxena & Valerie Cerra, 2002. "An Empirical Analysis of China's Export Behavior," IMF Working Papers 02/200, International Monetary Fund.
    23. Harvie, C., 1999. "China's Township and Village Enterprises and their Evolving Business Alliances and Organizational Change," Economics Working Papers wp99-6, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    24. Li, Xiaoming, 2000. "Reforming China's financial system and monetary policies: a sovereign remedy for locally initiated investment expansion?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 423-443, August.
    25. Jian Yang & David J. Leatham, 2001. "Currency Convertibility And Linkage Between Chinese Official And Swap Market Exchange Rates," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(3), pages 347-359, July.

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