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Trade contraction in the global crisis : employment and inequality effects in India and South Africa

  • Kucera, David
  • Roncolato, Leanne
  • von Uexkull, Erik

Estimates the effects of the 2008-09 trade contraction on employment and incomes in India and South Africa, using social accounting matrices (SAMs) in a Leontief multiplier model. Employment results are presented at aggregate and industry levels and examine gender and skills biases. Income results examine inequality at the level of rural and urban household income quintiles. The most notable finding is that India and South Africa experienced substantial employment and income declines as a result of trade contraction with the EU and the US. A large share of these declines occurred in the non-tradeable sector and resulted from income-induced effects, illustrating how a shock originated in the tradeable goods sector had strong ripple effects throughout India and South Africa.

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Paper provided by International Labour Organization in its series ILO Working Papers with number 459401.

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Length: 48 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Employment working paper series
Handle: RePEc:ilo:ilowps:459401
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  13. Leung, Ron & Stampini, Marco & Vencatachellum, Désiré, 2009. "Does Human Capital Protect Workers against Exogenous Shocks? South Africa in the 2008-2009 Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 4608, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  17. Menon, Nidhiya & Rodgers, Yana van der Meulen, 2009. "International Trade and the Gender Wage Gap: New Evidence from India's Manufacturing Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 965-981, May.
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