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Child labour, school attendance and academic performance : a review

  • Orazem, Peter F
  • Gunnarsson, Victoria

Explores methods for estimating the impact of child labour on student learning. Considers various measures of child labour and school performance and examines issues in sample design. Demonstrates the type of results that can be obtained with two multi-country data sets and makes suggestions for future research.

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File URL: http://www.ilo.org/public/libdoc/ilo/2003/103B09_460_engl.pdf
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Paper provided by International Labour Organization in its series ILO Working Papers with number 366541.

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Length: 34 p. ; pages
Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in ILO/IPEC working paper series
Handle: RePEc:ilo:ilowps:366541
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  1. Orazem, Peter, 1987. "Black-White Differences in Schooling Investment and Human Capital Production in Segregated Schools," Staff General Research Papers 11130, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Daniel R. Sherman, 1987. "Employment While in College, Academic Achievement, and Postcollege Outcomes: A Summary of Results," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-23.
  3. Gertler, Paul & Glewwe, Paul, 1990. "The willingness to pay for education in developing countries : Evidence from rural Peru," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 251-275, August.
  4. Psacharopoulos, George, 1993. "Returns to investment in education : a global update," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1067, The World Bank.
  5. Patrick M. Emerson & Andre Portela Souza, 2002. "Birth Order, Child Labor and School Attendance in Brazil," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0212, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  6. Harold Alderman & Peter F. Orazem & Elizabeth M. Paterno, 2001. "School Quality, School Cost, and the Public/Private School Choices of Low-Income Households in Pakistan," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(2), pages 304-326.
  7. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 1999. "Does child labor displace schooling? - evidence on behavioral responses to an enrollment subsidy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2116, The World Bank.
  8. F. Rosati & M. Rossi, 2001. "Children's Working Hours, School Enrolment and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from Pakistan and Nicaragua," UCW Working Paper 8, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  9. Sedlacek, Guilherme & Duryea, Suzanne & Ilahi, Nadeem & Sasaki, Masaru, 2005. "Child labor, schooling, and poverty in Latin America," Social Protection Discussion Papers 32742, The World Bank.
  10. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Evenson, Robert E, 1977. "Fertility, Schooling, and the Economic Contribution of Children in Rural India: An Econometric Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(5), pages 1065-79, July.
  11. Lam. D. & Schoeni, R.F., 1996. "Effects on Family Background on Earnings and Returns to Schooling: Evidence from Brazil," Papers 96-13, RAND - Reprint Series.
  12. George Psacharopoulos, 1997. "Child labor versus educational attainment Some evidence from Latin America," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 377-386.
  13. Terrance M. Hurley & James B. Kliebenstein & Peter F. Orazem, 2000. "An Analysis of Occupational Health in Pork Production," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 323-333.
  14. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1997. "Family size, schooling and child labor in Peru - An empirical analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 387-405.
  15. Jacoby, Hanan G & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1997. "Risk, Financial Markets, and Human Capital in a Developing Country," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 311-35, July.
  16. Eric Edmonds & Nina Pavcnik, 2002. "Does Globalization Increase Child Labor? Evidence from Vietnam," NBER Working Papers 8760, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Duryea, Suzanne & Hoek, Jasper & Lam, david & Levison, Deborah, 2005. "Dynamics of child labor : labor force entry and exit in urban Brazil," Social Protection Discussion Papers 32744, The World Bank.
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