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The effect of the l’Aquila earthquake on labour market outcomes


  • Giorgio Di Pietro

    () (University of Westminster & IZA)

  • Toni Mora

    () (Universitat Internacional de Catalunya & IEB)


Using Labour Force Survey individual-level data recently released by the Italian Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) where information is for the first time at available at provincial level, this paper looks at the short-term effects of the L’Aquila earthquake on labour market outcomes. Our estimates are based on a difference-in-differences (DiD) strategy that compares residents of L’Aquila with residents of a control area before and after the earthquake. The empirical results suggest that while the earthquake had no significant effect on the employment-population ratio, it led to a modest, but significant, reduction in labour force participation. There is also evidence of significant heterogeneous effects by gender and level of education.

Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Di Pietro & Toni Mora, 2011. "The effect of the l’Aquila earthquake on labour market outcomes," Working Papers 2011/41, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:2011/12/doc2011-41

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    More about this item


    Disaster; labour force participation; employment-population ratio; difference-in-differences;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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