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High Inequality, Low Revenue: Redistributive Efficiency on Latin American Fiscal Policy in Comparative Perspective

  • John Scott
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    There are three principal redistributive fiscal instruments available to governments in modern mixed economies: a) progressive taxes on income or assets, b) monetary transfers (social security and social assistance), and c) non- monetary transfers, or the subsidized provision of goods and services.

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    Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank in its series IDB Publications (Working Papers) with number 8907.

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    Date of creation: May 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:idb:brikps:8907
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    1. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-23, May.
    2. Kay, John A, 1990. "Tax Policy: A Survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(399), pages 18-75, March.
    3. Filmer, Deon & Hammer, Jeffrey S & Pritchett, Lant H, 2000. "Weak Links in the Chain: A Diagnosis of Health Policy in Poor Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(2), pages 199-224, August.
    4. Thomas, Vinod & Wang, Yan & Fan, Xibo, 2001. "Measuring education inequality - Gini coefficients of education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2525, The World Bank.
    5. Barr, Nicholas, 1992. "Economic Theory and the Welfare State: A Survey and Interpretation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 741-803, June.
    6. Eric A. Hanushek, . "Interpreting Recent Research on Schooling in Developing Countries," Wallis Working Papers WP3, University of Rochester - Wallis Institute of Political Economy.
    7. Sudhir Anand & Martin Ravallion, 1993. "Human Development in Poor Countries: On the Role of Private Incomes and Public Services," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 133-150, Winter.
    8. Marijn Verhoeven & Sanjeev Gupta & Erwin Tiongson, 1999. "Does Higher Government Spending Buy Better Results in Education and Health Care?," IMF Working Papers 99/21, International Monetary Fund.
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