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Hidden Liquidity: Determinants and Impact

Author

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  • Gökhan Cebiroglu
  • Ulrich Horst

Abstract

We cross-sectionally analyze the presence of aggregated hidden depth and trade volume in the S&P 500 and identify its key determinants. We find that the spread is the main predictor for a stock’s hidden dimension, both in terms of traded and posted liquidity. Our findings moreover suggest that large hidden orders are associated with larger transaction costs, higher price impact and increased volatility. In particular, as large hidden orders fail to attract (latent) liquidity to the market, hidden liquidity provision gives rise to negative liquidity externalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Gökhan Cebiroglu & Ulrich Horst, 2012. "Hidden Liquidity: Determinants and Impact," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2012-023, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:hum:wpaper:sfb649dp2012-023
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    File URL: http://sfb649.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/papers/pdf/SFB649DP2012-023.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moinas, Sophie, 2010. "Hidden Limit Orders and Liquidity in Order Driven Markets," IDEI Working Papers 600, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
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    5. Angel Pardo & Roberto Pascual, 2012. "On the hidden side of liquidity," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(10), pages 949-967, November.
    6. Bessembinder, Hendrik & Venkataraman, Kumar, 2004. "Does an electronic stock exchange need an upstairs market?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 3-36, July.
    7. Chordia, Tarun & Roll, Richard & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 2002. "Order imbalance, liquidity, and market returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 111-130, July.
    8. Anand, Amber & Weaver, Daniel G., 2004. "Can order exposure be mandated?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 405-426, October.
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    13. Harris, Lawrence E. & Panchapagesan, Venkatesh, 2005. "The information content of the limit order book: evidence from NYSE specialist trading decisions," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 25-67, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Hidden Liquidity; Pretrade Transparency; Iceberg Orders; Informed Trading; Market Impact; Market Quality; Liquidity Externalities; Upstairs Markets; Trade Negotiation;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage

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