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School Segregation and the Identification of Tipping Behavior

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  • Gregorio Caetano

    () (University of Rochester)

  • Vikram Maheshri

    () (University of Houston)

Abstract

We introduce an empirical framework that synthesizes the key insights of the Schelling model of segregation. Our framework builds upon an established empirical literature in neighborhood choice and can accommodate complex, realistic features that have been absent from prior analyses of tipping and segregation. We implement our approach to study racial segregation in Los Angeles County public schools from 2002-2006 and find substantial heterogeneity in tipping behavior across schools, with most schools featuring two segregated, stable equilibria and a tipping point ranging from 15-85% minority share. We discuss extensions to our analysis by considering alternative, more general specifications of segregation.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregorio Caetano & Vikram Maheshri, 2013. "School Segregation and the Identification of Tipping Behavior," Working Papers 2013-252-50, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  • Handle: RePEc:hou:wpaper:2013-252-50
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Blair, 2017. "Outside Options (Now) More Important than Race in Explaining Tipping Points in US Neighborhoods," Working Papers 2017-071, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Gregorio Caetano & Vikram Maheshri, 2013. "Do 'Broken Windows' Matter? Identifying Dynamic Spillovers in Criminal Behavior," Working Papers 2013-252-22, Department of Economics, University of Houston.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tipping; Segregation; Social Interactions;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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